Per non dovervi più disturbare

sgc

Member
Italiano
Buon giorno a tutti.
Potete dirmi se la frase "per non dovervi più disture" può essere così tradotta?

Vi scrivo la frase intera per farvi capire meglio il senso:

"Gradiremmo sapere se esiste un sito web al quale poter fare riferimento per avere notizie circa lo stato dei lavori riguardanti sia la torre sia l'area circostate, in modo tale da non dovervi più disturbare."

"We would like to know if there is a web site to which we can refer for answers regarding the construction work on both the tower and the sourrounding areas, to not disturb you again."

Essendo una lettera informale non sono sicura che la forma sia corretta!
Grazie
 
  • elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    I would say

    So that we have no
    need to contact you again, please could you let us know if you have a website to which we can refer for answers regarding the construction work on both the tower and the surrounding area.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Maybe a little more direct but no less polite would be something like
    In order not to bother you again, would you kindly let us know if there is a particular website that we can refer to regarding construction of both the tower and surrounding areas? Thank you for your time.

    @Elfa when I said a little more direct I wasn't referring to yours! I hadn't seen it yet...
     
    Last edited:

    trip54

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I would say

    So that we have no
    need to contact you again,....
    In order not to bother you again, ....
    @ Please elfa : To an Italian reader, the two sentences don't convey the same meaning. I mean that yours appears to be less polite, because I understand if I translate it litterally, "I don't want bother myself calling you again".
    My question is : Could it be in English too?
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Well since Elfa hasn't replied, I would say that hers is not impolite just a little cold, to my warm Canadian ears. :) I don't think it's saying "I don't want bother myself calling you again" but rather "so that there's no need to bother you again."
     

    elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    Well since Elfa hasn't replied, I would say that hers is not impolite just a little cold, to my warm Canadian ears. :) I don't think it's saying "I don't want bother myself calling you again" but rather "so that there's no need to bother you again."
    Yes, I see what you mean about the possible confusion! My problem with "in order not to bother you again" is that, to my ears, "bother" is not very formal, and I was trying to think of a way round that. We don't tend to write "in order not to bother you" - we tend to say it. I don't know what Rrose thinks...
     

    elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    Could it be "So that we have no need to disturb you again.."?
    Using "disturb" here is very 'Italian' - which is why both Rrose and I avoided it. I would use disturb when putting a sign up outside a room - "Do not disturb!" or to tell someone else "Don't disturb her - she's sleeping".
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Yes, I see what you mean about the possible confusion! My problem with "in order not to bother you again" is that, to my ears, "bother" is not very formal, and I was trying to think of a way round that. We don't tend to write "in order not to bother you" - we tend to say it. I don't know what Rrose thinks...
    I agree that "bother" borders on the informal but I wouldn't hesitate using it in this context, but this might come from more of a North American sensibility. I also agree with the use of disturb. However, I think we do use this all the time when speaking. "Can I disturb you for a minute?" when you see someone's in the middle of doing something, would not be out of place.
     
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