percentuale non trascurabile di polveri sottili

bach_caravel

Senior Member
italian
Non so tradurre il termine non trascurabile riferito a questo contesto
La maggior parte delle città con una percentuale non trascurabile di polveri sottili nell'aria è a nord
Ho tradotto
The most part of cities with a significant percentage of particulate are in the North

significant dà l'idea di non trascurabile?
 
  • tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    There we go. I think “remarkable” sounds a bit over the top, but “considerable” works for me. My SOED says (among other things): "That should be considered or taken into account". :thumbsup:
     

    Pat (√2)

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Ciao:)

    In statistica, si usa dire che una certa percentuale è "significativa" (significant) quando merita di essere presa in considerazione. Tuttavia...

    Bach, puoi dare un po' più di contesto? Di che testo si tratta? Ci sono frequenti riferimenti statistici o addirittura dati?
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I'm trying to translate 'polveri sottili', and don't like the sound of 'particulate' (mentioned in the OP), which wouldn't make any sense to me, in English. Wouldn't it be better (retranslating the original phrase) to refer to "particulate dust" or (better): 'tiny dust particles' or 'fine dust'?

    I found this definition (in English: Fine dust pollution is air pollution caused by fine particulate matters, which largely come from exhaust fumes from internal-combustion engines, smoke from factory chimneys and so on.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    'Particulate' is a term I've been seeing for years now in a variety of texts from different sources but relating to pollution. I think it may be in your interest to make your peace with it. :) Having said that, what do you think about 'fine (dust) particles'?

    Using 'matter' as a count noun is pretty particular isn't it? When I searched for your definition just now, the only hits other than WR were on Korean sites.
     

    Benzene

    Senior Member
    Italian from Italy
    I'm trying to translate 'polveri sottili', and don't like the sound of 'particulate' (mentioned in the OP), which wouldn't make any sense to me, in English. Wouldn't it be better (retranslating the original phrase) to refer to "particulate dust" or (better): 'tiny dust particles' or 'fine dust'?
    I found this definition (in English: Fine dust pollution is air pollution caused by fine particulate matters, which largely come from exhaust fumes from internal-combustion engines, smoke from factory chimneys and so on.
    I suggest "atmospheric aerosol particles".
    I wouldn't consider Korean websites.

    Please read more here:.......

    Bye,
    Benzene
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Thanks to both of you, Tsoapm (is that you, Mark?) and Benzene, for your input. Further research (seeking non Korean sources) got me to an EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency) explanation of "Particle Pollution" (a.k.a. "PM" or "particulate matter"), which defines it as: "a mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. Some particles, such as dust, dirt, soot, or smoke, are large or dark enough to be seen with the naked eye. Others are so small they can only be detected using an electron microscope. ...it goes on to say that some of the very tiny inhalable particles can get in your lungs or bloodstream...!:eek::(

    Yes, guess I'll have to make my peace with the term 'particulate'; at least I see it used as an adjective ('particulate matter') and not as a noun (which is what bothered me).
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    Just one little bit of extra information for you. I often hear in the US press the term "particulates" (note the plural form) as a stand-in for "particulate matter."

    La maggior parte delle città con una percentuale non trascurabile di polveri sottili nell'aria è a nord

    The most part of cities with a significant percentage of particulate are in the North
    So, if I were translating this I would say:

    A high percentage of the cities with significant atmospheric particulates are in the North.

    or

    The majority of (the) cities with significant atmospheric aerosol particles are in the North.

    You can mix and match the clauses however it sounds best to you.

    Phil
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Thanks once again. I checked Collins (my preference to Merriam-Webster), and they confirm 'particulate' as both a noun and an adjective, both for American English and for British English. However, Collins also indicates that in chemical engineering (specialized English) 'particulate' is only used as an adjective. So I suspect the term was added to spoken English (as a noun) in recent times (i.e. after I finished school). So I shall/must adjust (whether I like it or not).
     
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