perciò, quindi & dunque

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Tongue-tied

Member
UK - English
I’m trying to understand the proper use of perciò, quindi & dunque.
If anyone has a moment I’d appreciate a little guidance.

For example if I write:

“Noi piace spendere multo ore in giardino quindi pregari per una estate magnifica.”

...is that correct? Or should I use either ‘perciò’ or ‘dunque’. Or is there a choice? (What other mistakes have I made?!)

I’d also like to know how much you good people can take of the sorts of little questions I put to you. You may have gathered that I’ve recently started to study Italian. I go to an evening class once a week and otherwise have a few books and CDs. But your forum is the best resource I’ve come across and I don’t want to abuse it….

So, please, some general guidance on that too.

Again, many thanks.
 
  • archimede

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Tongue-tied said:
    “Noi piace spendere multo ore in giardino quindi pregari per una estate magnifica.”
    Sorry, does not compute. Can you clarify?

    Alessandro

    [Edit]Perhaps: A noi piace trascorrere molte ore in giardino, quindi ci auguriamo un'estate magnifica?
     

    Tongue-tied

    Member
    UK - English
    OK, so I've got it very wrong|
    I'm trying to say "We like to spend many hours in the garden so pray for a magnificent summer."

    I've just noticed your suggestion made at the end of your reply. Is it about what I'm trying to say?
     

    archimede

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Tongue-tied said:
    OK, so I've got it very wrong|
    I'm trying to say "We like to spend many hours in the garden so pray for a magnificent summer."

    I've just noticed your suggestion made at the end of your reply. Is it about what I'm trying to say?
    If pray stands for we pray then yes, that is more or less what I wrote.

    In general I'd say quindi, perciò e dunque are quite interchangeable, though the latter is slightly less used. But wait for someone else thoughts on this...

    Alessandro
     

    Tongue-tied

    Member
    UK - English
    "pregari" I thought might be the imperative form of pregare...so I thought I was saying "pray for..."

    Have you any thoughts about my more general question about the use we make of the forum? Or is that a separate thread?

    Cheers & thanks
     

    shaula

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Tongue-tied said:
    “Noi piace spendere multo ore in giardino quindi pregari per una estate magnifica.”

    ...is that correct? Or should I use either ‘perciò’ or ‘dunque’. Or is there a choice? (What other mistakes have I made?!)
    "A noi piace passare molte ore in giardino quindi/perciò/dunque speriamo (I wouldn't use "pregare" here) in un'estate magnifica."

    There' s little style difference though I would say they are all correct (then/therefore/thus?) :confused:

    Tongue-tied said:
    I’d also like to know how much you good people can take of the sorts of little questions I put to you. You may have gathered that I’ve recently started to study Italian. I go to an evening class once a week and otherwise have a few books and CDs. But your forum is the best resource I’ve come across and I don’t want to abuse it….
    I can answer for myself: I've been here for a very short time but I've never noticed any patronizing or offensive post in reply to a request. Most people speak 2 or more languages and everyone has gone through the troublesome process of learning another grammar. I found a lot of help in native speakers and I'm more than glad if I can pay back my debt :)

    Ciao
    shaula
     

    shaula

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Tongue-tied said:
    "pregari" I thought might be the imperative form of pregare...so I thought I was saying "pray for..."
    The imperative would be "prega" (one person) or "pregate" (more than one person). Still I would use "spera" or "sperate".

    Ciao
    shaula
     

    archimede

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Tongue-tied said:
    "pregari" I thought might be the imperative form of pregare...so I thought I was saying "pray for..."
    Nope, that would be preghiamo (noi) or pregate (voi).
    Tongue-tied said:
    Have you any thoughts about my more general question about the use we make of the forum?
    I'm not a moderator, but as far as I'm concerned I don't see it as a problem: general questions can be useful for everybody, just don't expect exact and unambiguous replies. ;)

    Alessandro
     

    ikester

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Tongue-tied said:
    I’d also like to know how much you good people can take of the sorts of little questions I put to you.

    ...your forum is the best resource I’ve come across and I don’t want to abuse it….

    So, please, some general guidance on that too.
    We who "hang out" on this forum do so simply because we enjoy it. I've never seen anyone say, "Hey! You ask too many questions!" :D

    I've been speaking Italian for over 15 years, but I've learned many things in the couple of months I've been frequenting this forum. Not only do we all learn, but some of the questions initiate very interesting and entertaining discussions.

    As long as you have questions you want answered, ask away!

    ciao!
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Tongue-tied said:
    I’m trying to understand the proper use of perciò, quindi & dunque.
    If anyone has a moment I’d appreciate a little guidance.

    For example if I write:

    “Noi piace spendere multo ore in giardino quindi pregari per una estate magnifica.”

    ...is that correct? Or should I use either ‘perciò’ or ‘dunque’. Or is there a choice? (What other mistakes have I made?!)

    I’d also like to know how much you good people can take of the sorts of little questions I put to you. You may have gathered that I’ve recently started to study Italian. I go to an evening class once a week and otherwise have a few books and CDs. But your forum is the best resource I’ve come across and I don’t want to abuse it….

    So, please, some general guidance on that too.

    Again, many thanks.
    here is a general guidance

    they are interchangeable when the meaning is
    e per questo motivo - and for this reason
    and you can use "so", "therefore"
    * ho molto da fare, perciò (dunque, quindi) mi fermerò in ufficio fino a tardi, I've got a lot to do, so I'll stay on late at the office
    * A è uguale a B, B è uguale a C, perciò (quindi, dunque) A è uguale a C, A equals B, B equals C, therefore A equals C

    you should use 'dunque' when you want to intensify the following words (con valore rafforzativo) using "then", "well (then)"; "so"
    * eccoti dunque di ritorno, so you're back then
    you should use 'dunque' when you want to use an illative conjunction (con valore conclusivo) so, well:
    * dunque, per tornare al nostro discorso..., so, to get back to the subject ( to what we were saying)...
    * dicevo dunque che..., so I was saying that...;
    just a little side note about dunque:
    * venire al dunque = to get to the point or to cut a long story short.

    you should use quindi when the meaning is "afterwards" (in seguito) using "then", "afterwards":
    * prima rifletti, quindi agisci, think first, then act
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Tongue-tied said:
    We like to spend many hours in the garden so pray for a magnificent summer
    Ci piace passare molte ore in giardino, perciò prega che sia un'estate magnifica!

    I'm not sure what comes next, but as you underlined, it's like you're talking to someone and then you say: pray for that! (it sounds like a threat!) or even it'd better be a wondeful summer! otherwise... (and then I don't know what's on your mind :D)

    I hope that is not causing you more confusion ;)
     

    granturco

    Member
    Il turco
    Secondo me, c'è una confussione tra pregare e prepararsi.

    Lui intende di dire (il mio parere)

    "Ci piace passare molte ore in giardino(nei tempi d'estate), perciò preparati(tu) per una estate magnifica."

    eh?
     
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