Period within quotation or outside? [BE; AE]

wathavy

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi.

I am wondering if there is any rule for dropping a period when you use " " marks within your sentence.

I was thinking the period will reside within when the sentence was quoited.
And the example would be like,
[ The sentence like "This could be an evil ghost who must have died with unfinished business."]

While the sentence like this,
[ I know the building called "Haunted house".]
has period at the end because the " " has noun alone.

Or am I wrong totally?
Anybody could give me what must have been the rule for this?
I am simply curious.

Thank you in advance. :)
 
  • Titi Hilda

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Hello Wathavy:

    Here is an excellent explanation of the use of quotation marks and punctuation:

    www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/quotation_mark

    The sentences that follow are from this same source:

    The traditional convention in American English is for commas and periods to be included inside the quotation marks, regardless of whether they are part of the quoted sentence, whereas the British style places them inside or outside the quotation marks according to whether or not the punctuation is part of the quoted phrase...
     

    johndot

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There is no one simple answer to this question; as Titi Hilda has said, most writers will have a personal preference, or be guided by the style guide which is relevant to the piece they’re writing (style guides themselves can vary a good deal).

    As for me, I have a simple rule, but it approaches your question from the opposite angle, if you like: I put nothing inside quotation marks which is not part of the citation except (and this is the only exception) anything enclosed in square brackets.
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    So, can I live with what I am doing, as well, then?
    Thank you.

    I would advise you to stick to that style unless you intend to write American English.

    Examples taken from the Wikipedia article mentioned in an earlier post in this thread:

    “Carefree” means “free from care or anxiety.” (American style)
    “Carefree” means “free from care or anxiety”. (British style)

    While there are American writers who choose the British style, they are a minority. Most Americans were taught the American style and would see the other style as odd, and would likely see it as incorrect.
     

    wathavy

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Your examples in post #1 look just fine to me, wathavy.
    Thanks John!
    I am glad to hear that. :)

    While there are American writers who choose the British style, they are a minority. Most Americans were taught the American style and would see the other style as odd, and would likely see it as incorrect.
    Oh, that's too bad, mplsray.
    I don't think my book will make a good business anyway, so I cannot worry too much, though;), I am glad to hear your advise.

    Thank you to all.
    Cheers.

    P.S.
    Very educative... and divine. :)
     
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