Persian: بردبار /bordbâr "tolerant/uncomplaining/patient"

PersoLatin

Senior Member
UK
Persian - Iran
This is commonly (always really) pronounced as bordbâr and seems to be a simple compound made of برد/bord "bear/carry"+ بار/bâr "load".

My question regards the first part (برد/bord "it carried") which seems to be the 3rd person singular simple past tense of بردن "to bear/carry" but semantically (in that compound) it is closer to برد/barad the 3rd person singular subjunctive tense, i.e. "it bears/carries", does anyone know if this pronunciation "baradbâr" (or bardbâr) has also been used, maybe in poetry", or it is still used in other Persian dialects or in a related language like Kurdish?
 
  • mannoushka

    Senior Member
    Iran/Persian
    How to spot a difference between bordbaar and bardbaar by looking at the word in a text or from reciting verse -- not easy.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    How to spot a difference between bordbaar and bardbaar by looking at the word in a text or from reciting verse -- not easy.
    I have always known the word as burdbaar and it is regularly used in Urdu with the same meaning as PersoLatin has provided. If it were to be used in poetry, I presume one could differentiate it from baradbaar from the vazn prospective.

    خردمند گر دل کند بردبار
    نباشد بچشم جهاندار خوار

    فردوسی

    Can we not think of بُرد as the shortened form of the infinitive بُردن ? So بردنِ بار goes to بردبار "bearing of burden" and then "bearer of burden" or simply "a burden-bearer".
     
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    mannoushka

    Senior Member
    Iran/Persian
    Can we not think of بُرد as the shortened form of the infinitive بُردن ? So بردنِ بار goes to بردبار "bearing of burden" and then "bearer of burden" or simply "a burden-bearer".
    Good thinking. I am wondering if the word was not originally, like, برده- بار, borde- baar, as in someone who has already been burdened with quite a load and carried it and so has developed the temperament to deal patiently with whatever he or she may be burdened with in life. This suggested origin would make the adjective somewhat similar to آسوده‌خاطر.
     
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    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Can we not think of بُرد as the shortened form of the infinitive بُردن ? So بردنِ بار goes to بردبار "bearing of burden" and then "bearer of burden" or simply "a burden-bearer".
    This word must have been applied to those poor horses donkeys & oxen who without complaining (outwardly), bear the burden, hence my idea of barad/carries.
     
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