Persian: قانون بودجه

truce

Senior Member
Persian
Greetings,
What is the best equivalent for "قانون بودجه" in English?
Thanks in advance
 
  • PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    To me here قانون doesn't mean law/regulation, it seems to mean the "calculation & methods" used for breaking down or dividing the budget.
     

    truce

    Senior Member
    Persian
    To me here قانون doesn't mean law/regulation, it seems to mean the "calculation & methods" used for breaking down or dividing the budget.
    Actually it is a law in Iran, approved annually. Example:
    بند "ه" تبصره 16 قانون بودجه سال 1400
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Actually it is a law in Iran, approved annually. Example:
    بند "ه" تبصره 16 قانون بودجه سال 1400
    I can see that once the break down or allocation of the budget is passed in the parliament, the way it is spent becomes tied to the law, why not call it بودجه قانونی but what do I know.
     

    truce

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I can see that once the break down or allocation of the budget is passed in the parliament, the way it is spent becomes tied to the law, why not call it بودجه قانونی but what do I know.
    Well "بودجه قاونی" is not a common phrase and is jarring to all in Iran.
    What is commonly said among people and written in the news is "قانون بودجه"
    How about the UK and USA? What "قانون بودجه" is called in those countries?
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    How about the UK and USA? What "قانون بودجه" is called in those countries
    That’s why I’m struggling to work out what قانون بودجه is to then be able to translate it accurately to, or find its equivalent in, English.
     

    truce

    Senior Member
    Persian
    That’s why I’m struggling to work out what قانون بودجه is to then be able to translate it accurately to, or find its equivalent in, English.
    I just found the phrase "Finance Act" on the Wikipedia. (the link below)
    Finance Act - Wikipedia
    But it seems that the phrase "Finance Act" is applicable only in UK and no other country.
     

    Jashn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    In Parliament, a 'bill' is a proposed law, which if passed, becomes an 'act' of Parliament.

    So in common parlance, people just refer to the item from the budget generally, or specifically talk about 'the budget' when discussing what the government is proposing to do in its bill. E.g. 'The government has earmarked $500 million for climate change'. Or, 'Parliament is debating the government's proposal to increase income tax by 5% in its budget', etc.

    When the bill receives the endorsement of a majority of the House, they say, 'the budget/finance (bill) has passed'.

    Then it's sent to the House of Lords/Senate for debate and another vote, then it goes to the Queen (or Governor General in Canada/Australia/New Zealand) for Royal Assent, after which it's recorded as the 'finance act' in the Acts of Parliament.

    So from a Westministerial gov't point of view, how you translate your Farsi term depends on where we are in the legislative process. Since people usually discuss/debate the budget prior to its adoption by Parliament, the first two options ('budget', 'budget/finance bill') are probably best, unless it's a discussion examining a Finance Act from history.
     
    Last edited:

    truce

    Senior Member
    Persian
    In Parliament, a 'bill' is a proposed law, which if passed, becomes an 'act' of Parliament.

    So in common parlance, people just refer to the item from the budget generally, or specifically talk about 'the budget' when discussing what the government is proposing to do in its bill. E.g. 'The government has earmarked $500 million for climate change'. Or, 'Parliament is debating the government's proposal to increase income tax by 5% in its budget', etc.

    When the bill receives the endorsement of a majority of the House, they say, 'the budget (bill) has passed'.

    Then it's sent to the Queen (or Governor General in Canada/Australia/New Zealand) for Royal Assent, after which it's recorded as the 'finance act' in the Acts of Parliament.

    So from a Westministerial gov't point of view, how you translate your Farsi term depends on where we are in the legislative process. I'm not certain from what you've written what the best translation is, but it's probably either, 'The Budget', 'The Budget Bill', or 'the Finance Act'. And since people are usually discussing/debating the budget prior to its adoption by Parliament, the first two options are probably best, unless it's a discussion examining a Finance Act from history.
    Thanks for your reply. "قانون بودجه" is the "لایحه بودجه" when is passed by the Parliament.
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    'budget', 'budget/finance bill')
    Completely agree with this.

    "The budget" is the most suitable answer which makes sense to any English speaker. ("The 1400 budget")

    I am still perplexed as to why قانون, which is misleading, was added to this fairly common term.
     
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