Persian: یه توک پا بیا دم در، کارت دارم

seitt

Senior Member
English/Welsh
Greetings,

Re this wonderful piece of Colloquial Persian (Courtesy of Morteza): یه توک پا بیا دم در، کارت دارم, what situation does it bring to mind? What picture does it create in your mind?

Do you imagine someone coming to house in a friendly neighbourhood which always has its front door open and calling to someone inside the house, for example?

As you are no doubt aware, learning to think like an Iranian with regard to the pictures we form in our minds is a very great help in learning a language.

Best wishes, and many thanks,

Simon
 
  • searcher123

    Senior Member
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    I will imagine a very courteous affable person that is ashamed of taking your time for his/her need, but there is not another alternative and [s]he should call you of inside the house.

    Again, my question please:

    In Persian, when we say در خونه‌ام هميشه به روي همه بازه we mean هركس به منزل من بيايد، از آمدنش بسيار خوشحال خواهم شد و به او خوش‌آمد خواهم گفت. In other word, this is an idiom and its meaning is not 'the door of my house always is opened and I'm not closed it at all'.

    When you told 'always has its front door open', the meaning of it was the same or you used it in its literally meaning?
     

    seitt

    Senior Member
    English/Welsh
    Many thanks, very useful cultural insight.

    Actually, I did use it literally. If we wish to use it figuratively we must say something like this: "My door is always open to everybody."

    In this case there may be times when the door is locked, let alone just closed, but the point is that you never deliberately turn anyone away without letting them talk to you.
     

    seitt

    Senior Member
    English/Welsh
    دم is a difficult word for me. Doesn't it mean "breath" rather than "close" (which I assume it means here)?
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    دم is a difficult word for me. Doesn't it mean "breath" rather than "close" (which I assume it means here)?
    Yes دم/dam does mean 'breath' also a 'short time' (length of a breath) but it also means close/near but this latter meaning might have developed in colloquial language due to misreading of something like: برای یک دم میایم در خانه ی شما/I will come to yours for a short time, or in terms like دم صبح/start of morning from دمیدن but this, for the same reason as above, can also mean 'close/near to morning'

    I am not sure of this proposition, let's see what others say.
     

    eskandar

    Moderator
    English (US)
    There is another meaning to دم when used as a preposition (with ezaafe) which does mean near, close to. It's attested for in Hayyim(see definition 2) and in that sense is nothing new or especially colloquial; you can find دمِ در or دمِ دست throughout classical Persian poetry.
     

    mannoushka

    Senior Member
    Iran/Persian
    Hi. One meaning of dam is ‘edge’. Here, though, the word acts as a preposition: come to the door.

    I picture a young(ish) and friendly figure such as a friend, cousin, neighbour or coworker talking into the buzzer asking the person inside to nip out as the speaker has some business to discuss with them. The register is informal, familiar, and just a touch streetwise, just a touch, mind; you wouldn’t for instance expect a nephew to speak so to an uncle. An uncle on the other hand, may well say those words to a younger member of the household.
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Thanks eskandar, I couldn't find that meaning anywhere in Dehkhoda, as a native speaker and in speech, I use/have used and hear/have heard دم/dam as a preposition, with the sense "near/close", much more often than its other sense. Of course its "breath" sense is omnipresent in literature and very formal speech.

    There is another meaning to دم when used as a preposition (with ezaafe) which does mean near, close to. It's attested for in Hayyim(see definition 2) and in that sense is nothing new or especially colloquial; you can find دمِ در or دمِ دست throughout classical Persian poetry.
    This is definition 2 which refers back to definition 1 (to its "breath" sense).

    2) دم (p. V1-0850) دم (dam'eh) (۲) Preposition Near, by, at. Ex. دم در at the door; also, outside the door.
    دم دست At hand, nearby. [Note. This is originally a contraction of the phrase در دم ِ || See دم No. 1.]


    To me the preposition sense is used for "very very close" physical placements, almost as if, you are that close you'd fall in if you get any closer, and that is not too far in meaning to the other sense, so close to someone you can almost feel their breath.
     
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    mannoushka

    Senior Member
    Iran/Persian
    ... you can find دمِ در or دمِ دست throughout classical Persian poetry.
    You can? Thanks for pointing that out; I did not know that.

    In any case, دمِ در can also mean ‘by the door’, ‘near the door’, ‘at the door’.
    دمِ درِ خانه ایستادم تا پِیک برسد.
    I stood by the front door of the house waiting for the courier to show up.

    If used along with the name of a place, the understanding always is that somewhere just outside that place is being indicated.
    دمِ سینما قرارِ دیدار گذاشتیم
    We said we’d meet in front of the picturehouse. (Picturehouse?? Is that still a thing?)
     
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