Persian, Dari, Urdu: Mudir Sahib

  • Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    I am not sure if it is used in the same sense as in Urdu.
    I believe you are right, nevertheless I thought it worth pointing out particularly as in the transliteration you cannot tell which s and which h you have and the fact that it isn't used in quite the same sense might make one suspicious that the fact it sounds like صاحب is a coincidence
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    It depends upon the language. Persophones would better be able to explain to you the extent to which مدیر I.e. mudeer is used in Persian but in Turkish the usage of müdür is quite expansive extending from a principal to a manager or a Director. In Arabic the usage is also quite varied and can be used for any bigshot akin to how in english we use the term boss or in Spanish Jefe. In Urdu however, from experience I've only ever heard the term be used for editors. I may be wrong but such has been my personal experience. The female equivalent would be Mudeerah.

    As for SaaHib I have not yet heard it be used in Persian in the manner that you have indicated above. Are you certain that the book isn't just the work of an orientalist who likes missing terminology as many of them do?
     
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    Yasmeen El Araby

    Member
    Arabic
    I am not sure if it is used in Persian in the same sense as in Urdu.
    Thanks a lot. Since the text is about an incident that took place in Afghanistan, I found that in Pashto, Sahib means Mr. and Mudeer means director, so it is Mr. Director. I hope that if there is anyone here who knows Pashto to confirm this meaning to me.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thanks a lot. Since the text is about an incident that took place in Afghanistan, I found that in Pashto, Sahib means Mr. and Mudeer means director, so it is Mr. Director. I hope that if there is anyone here who knows Pashto to confirm this meaning to me.
    I would suggest to you that "SaaHib" would be used in Pashto in the same sense as it is used in Urdu.
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Thanks a lot. Since the text is about an incident that took place in Afghanistan, I found that in Pashto, Sahib means Mr. and Mudeer means director, so it is Mr. Director. I hope that if there is anyone here who knows Pashto to confirm this meaning to me.
    I can confirm that SaaHib is used by Dari speakers whether this has something to do with their contact with Urdu-phones is a moot point. My personal inkling is that it has more to do with Classical Persian. Similarly SaaHib is also used in Pashto. In Afghanistan it is a commonly understood term much as in Egypt they use استاذ for Mr far more than they do say in the Gulf.
     
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