Persian: extended bread (sic)

DrLindenbrock

Senior Member
Italian
Hi,
I was reading an article in the Italian press about the Iranian's government desire to "persianize" the word for "pizza" (coherently with the policy of finding Persian equivalents to foreign borrowings).
The result the panel of linguists (I assume it was them) came up with was - according to the journalist who wrote the article - "extended (or extendable) bread".
I was wondering whether:
- this is true, and not just a rumour.
- what would the Persian "new" expression be.

Xeyli mamnun :)
 
  • Tisia

    Senior Member
    Iran, Persian, Kurdish, English, Finnish
    Hi,
    I was reading an article in the Italian press about the Iranian's government desire to "persianize" the word for "pizza" ...
    - this is true, and not just a rumour.
    - what would the Persian "new" expression be.
    Xeyli mamnun :)
    I just heard this from you. I just googled about it and found an article that talks about. In the article it quotes that the Persian equivalent word for 'Pizza' should be called 'Elastic Loaves' as ordered by Mahmud Ahmadi Nejad.

    Funny. I have heard in an Iranian movie the main character calls it 'shoe box' just as a satire because he was taken the pizzas to his beloved's wedding party where she was marrying someone else. I understoon him, but what is wrong with government. What are they mourning about?

    And answer to the other question: the Persian word for 'new' is 'now' or 'tazeh'.

    Regards
    Tisia
     

    DrLindenbrock

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thank you Tisia!
    So, how would "elastic loaves" be in Persian?
    And thank you for answering to my second question, but actually I know how you say the word "new" in Persian. I meant that the expression "extended loaves" was an apparently new creation of the government.:)
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Wow! I have no idea.

    It's still "Pizza" to me.

    And honestly, although I have used the Academy to defend my use of Persian over Farsi, nobody is really gonna listen to them. :) :D

    Honestly, I didn't know about this until today--and it happened in July. :) So obviously the Academy can't expect this word to be mainstream...although in the article it did say that it was more focused on Iran. But whatever. I still call it PIZZA.

    Here's a list of other words in Persian that came from English.

    From my post in this thread:
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=116718&highlight=English

    Since Farsi is such an ancient language, most modern words are borrowed from English.
    (Accents are placed on the area of the word that is stressed)
    Car is mutár (From English MOTOR)
    Sink is
    sínk (From English SINK)
    Phone is tilafún

    Computer: compyutár
    Couch: Couch
    Hotel: Hotél
    Bus Service/Bus: Servéys
    Doctor: doctár
    Television: Talvisún
    Bicycle: Bisikél
    Radio: Râdyó
    Lane: Lín
    Motorcycle: Motarsikél
    Tub: Tub
    Machine: Mâšín
    Course: Kórs
    Camera: Kâmrá
    Traffic: Trâfík
    Thermos: Tarmúz
    Coke: Koke
    Microphone: Microfún
    Biography: Biografí
    Antibiotic: Ântibotík
    Counter: Kâwntér
    Remote: rimót
    Channel: Canál
    Volume: Vâlyúm
    Salad: Salâd (accent on âd)
    Salad: Salâtá


     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    I was reading an article in the Italian press about the Iranian's government desire to "persianize" the word for "pizza" (coherently with the policy of finding Persian equivalents to foreign borrowings).
    The result the panel of linguists (I assume it was them) came up with was - according to the journalist who wrote the article - "extended (or extendable) bread".
    I was wondering whether:
    - this is true, and not just a rumour.
    - what would the Persian "new" expression be.
    Xeyli mamnun :)
    My I refer to a post and a blog entry I wrote a few months ago about the 'kesh loghmeh' thing and the silly articles in the press about it? What the journalist is concerned: as far as I could trace it, (s)he just copied an old AP article, and (s)he doesn't seem to know Farsi (or English).

    Groetjes,
    Frank
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Hmm "kesh loghmeh" would mean "extended/stretched out/pulled/elongated bite," as in bite of food." That's funny! :D :)
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    Well, the original Italian word for pizza, viz. pinza/pinzo, meant 'point', how clarifying is that?
    And given the average quality of the pizzas in the average 'restaurant', Persian 'elastic snack' isn't that bad a translation, imho.
    Any which way, I don't know one single Iranian gourmand or Iranian restaurant holder who uses the word kesh loghmeh.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    DrLindenbrock

    Senior Member
    Italian
    My I refer to a post and a blog entry I wrote a few months ago about the 'kesh loghmeh' thing and the silly articles in the press about it? What the journalist is concerned: as far as I could trace it, (s)he just copied an old AP article, and (s)he doesn't seem to know Farsi (or English).

    Groetjes,
    Frank
    Thank you Frank,:)
    your post gave the final answer to my question.:)
    You're probably right in saying the journalist copied an old article, but I woulnd't blame him/her for not knowing Persian. As for English, I don't know, but remember I read the article in Italian so perhaps even more got lost in translation.
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    keš-loqme!!!! stretchy morsel. It's the first time I hear it :D:D We say pitzâ and nothing else and nobody can change it.

    Who had been said the coiner of this word anyway? Persian Academy or Ahmadinejad? Here [http://persianacademy.ir/fa/wordspdf.aspx] you can see words approved by Persian Academy. I didn't find pizza in the Latin-ordered lists. I doubt Persian Academy interferes in such words.

    If possible, please send me the link to the Italian article.
     
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