Persian: Facing, in front of

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panjabigator

Senior Member
Am. English
In Urdu, there is a poetic way (at least I think so) of saying "in front of" or "facing:" /ru-ba-ru/. What do you say in Persian?

How would you translate these sentences?

"I am standing facing the woman."
"I am standing in front of the woman."

The more common word in Urdu would be /saamne/.
/mai.n khaaD.aa huu.n aurat ke saamne/
 
  • Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    You will find that Persian, especially that of Afghanistan, is very poetic.

    Facing is rubaru as you have said:

    Rubaru-az-zan stâd astam.
    I'm standing in front of/facing the woman

    Rubara-az-dukân as.
    It's facing the store/in front of the store

    Kujâ as? / Where is it
    Rubaru / Right in front of you, facing you

    :D :)

     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    "Astam" is the first person singular conjugation of the verb "to be."

    The following conversation is for spoken Afghan Persian; this is different than spoken Iranian Persian, but written Iranian and Afghan Persian are the same. :)

    Astam (I am)
    Asti (you are)
    As (he/she/it is)
    Astim (we are)
    Astin (you all, they, you singular formal)

    Like English, this is the only "to be" verb.

    Persian, as far as I'm concerned, doesn't really have too many auxiliary verbs that are clearly fitted to that single purpose (being an auxiliary verb)

    Az means of; it is a preposition.

    Az-ma --> mine
    Az-tu --> yours
    Az-u --> his/her's/ its
    Az-mâ --> ours
    Az-šoma --> you all, you singular formal
    Az-wâ --> theirs

    We put the dash between to show that it is the preposition and that the terms usually go together.
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    "Astam" is the first person singular conjugation of the verb "to be."

    The following conversation is for spoken Afghan Persian; this is different than spoken Iranian Persian, but written Iranian and Afghan Persian are the same. :)

    Astam (I am)
    Asti (you are)
    As (he/she/it is)
    Astim (we are)
    Astin (you all, they, you singular formal)

    Like English, this is the only "to be" verb.

    Persian, as far as I'm concerned, doesn't really have too many auxiliary verbs that are clearly fitted to that single purpose (being an auxiliary verb)

    Az means of; it is a preposition.

    Az-ma --> mine
    Az-tu --> yours
    Az-u --> his/her's/ its
    Az-mâ --> ours
    Az-šoma --> you all, you singular formal
    Az-wâ --> theirs

    We put the dash between to show that it is the preposition and that the terms usually go together.
    I've seen the verb written as "hastam/hasti/hast/hastid/hastand/hastim", as well. Well, check that; I'm not POSITIVE I've seen it in the writing form (aside from ast, which I've seen a hell of a lot) because, in spoken Iranian form, it's always pronounced with the "h" in front if stated at all. Normally, it's abbreviated. E.g.: Man khasteh hastam (I'm tired) would be how it would be written in the written form of Persian, but, in speaking, it is said as "Man khastam". This also applies to the other forms:
    you're tired= to khastei
    he's/she's/it's tired= u/oo khastast
    you (formal)/you all are tired= shomaa khaste-in
    we're tired= maa khaste-im.
    they're tired= unhaa khastan
    he/she is tired (formal)/they're tired (again)=ishun khastan
    Note: This is the SPOKEN form. It's slightly different in the written form, but it's to late in the day for me to go into that, now.

    Peace
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    We use "rubaru" in Gujarati (રૂબરૂ) and like you said panjabigator, in Urdu too.

    In my opinion the word means "in one's presence" or "face to face".
    You hear this word in nikaahs (the compulsory bit of Muslim weddings when the vows are exchanged, if you like).
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    I've seen the verb written as "hastam/hasti/hast/hastid/hastand/hastim", as well. Well, check that; I'm not POSITIVE I've seen it in the writing form (aside from ast, which I've seen a hell of a lot) because, in spoken Iranian form, it's always pronounced with the "h" in front if stated at all.
    In Afghanistan (when speaking) we don't pronounce the "h." :) We tend to drop off the front few sounds of words. :) :D
     
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