Persian: I'm a Persian girl

  • Tisia

    Senior Member
    Iran, Persian, Kurdish, English, Finnish
    I''m a persian girl, I like meeting other persians & I like being with my friends and going shopping!
    It goes like this (If the 'Persian' word here imlpies Iranian not a Persian speaking person):

    Formal: Man yek dokhtare Irani hastam, doost daaram digar Iraaniha ra bebinam, az boodan ba doostaanam lazzat mibaram va az kharid hosham mi'aayad.

    Informal: Man ye dokhtare Ironi hastam, doost daaram digar Ironiha ro bebinam, az boodan ba doostaanam lazzat mibaram va az kharid hosham miaad.

    Regards
    Tisia
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    The Afghan version would be a bit different than what Tisia wrote, but hers, as always, are 100% amazing :) :D

    Afghan Version:

    Ma yag doxtara Irâni astam, hošam myâya diga Irânyâra bibinam, az budan ba dustanam lezat mibaram, sowdâ raftan/xaridan hošam myaya.

    :) :D
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    It goes like this (If the 'Persian' word here imlpies Iranian not a Persian speaking person):

    Formal: Man yek dokhtare Irani hastam, doost daaram digar Iraaniha ra bebinam, az boodan ba doostaanam lazzat mibaram va az kharid hosham mi'aayad.

    Informal: Man ye dokhtare Ironi hastam, doost daaram digar Ironiha ro bebinam, az boodan ba doostaanam lazzat mibaram va az kharid hosham miaad.

    Regards
    Tisia
    Hosham?! I wouldn't go with hosham. I think a better transliteration would be "khosham" or "xosham." Granted, the "kh" sound may be difficult to pronounce for those who aren't speakers of Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and other such languages that have such a sound in their languages' phonology, but we might as well write it correctly. Oh, and I think that, at least in the informal (by which I'm assuming you mean colloquial or spoken Persian), it would be better to write "Iraanihaa ye digeh ro bebinam." And "lezzat" is most certainly NOT pronounced as "lazzat", at least in Iranian Persian. It feels a bit "off" to me, but I generally agree with the translation.
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    Ok, I'm gonna take a stab at this. By the way, this is how I believe it is to be best translated in SPOKEN Persian.
    "I'm a persian girl, I like meeting other persians & I like being with my friends. I like going shopping, too!" would be translated thusly, though:

    "Man ye dokhtar e Iraani-am. Az aashnaa shodan baa Iraani haa ye digeh khosham miyaad va dust daaram baa dust-haam vaqt begzarunam. Kheyli ahl e kharid ham hastam."

    My apologies to any future posters for any errors you may see in this translation, but this is the first translation that came to mind. I changed the English version of this ever so slightly because the grammar was a bit off. One can't say that he or she likes doing this and this and this! The correct way to say this would be to say that "One likes doing this, this, and this."
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Hosham?! I wouldn't go with hosham. I think a better transliteration would be "khosham" or "xosham." Granted, the "kh" sound may be difficult to pronounce for those who aren't speakers of Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and other such languages that have such a sound in their languages' phonology, but we might as well write it correctly.
    Hi Abba :)

    Wouldn't you agree that the:

    "h" in xošam

    is a much lighter, and a completely different, sound than the

    "x" in kâqaz (paper) Speaking about the transliterated form, of course.

    Anyway, just wanted to see what you think. I think, for the most part, the consonants are pronounced the same in Afghanistan and Iran.

    :) :D Xodâ fez


     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    Hi Abba :)

    Wouldn't you agree that the:

    "h" in hošam

    is a much lighter, and a completely different, sound than the

    "x" in kâxaz (paper) Speaking about the transliterated form, of course.

    Anyway, just wanted to see what you think. I think, for the most part, the consonants are pronounced the same in Afghanistan and Iran.

    :) :D Xodâ fez
    Hi, Bienvenidos,

    No, I don't agree. There is no "x" sound in the Iranian Persian pronounciation of kâghaz. I write kâghaz thusly, because it's supposed to be pronounced as the French pronounce their r's and the Arabs pronounce the letter
    غ
    Now, Iranians, apparently, don't necessarily pronounce "gheyn" that way, and may pronounce "gheyn" the same way that they pronounce "qaaf", which I choose to differentiate from the "gh" sound by using a "q". Nothing necessarily new, of course. Anyway, there is no "soft" form for saying "x" or "kh" as far as I know. "Gh" is the closest thing to a "soft" "x" that I can think of, but I'm sure you already know that no one writes "khosh/xosh" as "ghosh"!

    lezzat=pleasure. I'm about 99.9% confident in saying that it is an Arabic loanword, just because it sounds like one. I have no idea how it is written in Persian, but I'm guessing that it's probably going to be written with an Arabic form of "z" (what with there being 4 different ways of writing "z" in the Perso-Arabic alphabet) "Lezzat bordan"= literally, "to take pleasure"

    Qorbunet, Bienvenidos Jaan,
    Kaveh
     

    Tisia

    Senior Member
    Iran, Persian, Kurdish, English, Finnish
    Hosham?! I wouldn't go with hosham. I think a better transliteration would be "khosham" or "xosham." ...............
    Ops, sorry that is a misspell. I definitely mean 'khosham'. The reason I have it at two places mentioned is that the informal version is a copy-paste of the formal one. Any way, your Persian is definitely better than mine since Persian is not my mother tongue and have never lived in Iran:) The reason I pronounced 'lezzat' as 'lazzat' might come from the fact that I speak Arabic and have lived in Arabic countries for a some time.

    Best Regards
    Tisia
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Hi, Bienvenidos,

    No, I don't agree. There is no "x" sound in the Iranian Persian pronounciation of kâghaz. I write kâghaz thusly, because it's supposed to be pronounced as the French pronounce their r's and the Arabs pronounce the letter
    Ah I feel kind of embarrassed :eek:, I'm sorry, let me tell you what I meant.

    First off, transliteration is not my forte. :D Secondly, I retract my previous erroneous spelling and agree that it is "gh;" what I meant is the sound of the h, not the sound of the letter, when you say it to yourself, the way your tongue touches the back of your mouth:

    When I say kaqaz (kaghaz), my tongue moves to a place farther back in my mouth than when I say xošam,so that's why I thought it was more like the English H in this clase. But I'm no expert at phonology so I'll leave it at that.

    Sorry for the confusion. :D

    Any way, your Persian is definitely better than mine since Persian is not my mother tongue and have never lived in Iran:)

    Best Regards
    Tisia
    I never would have believed it! :) What is your native language? You speak so many! :) My Persian is deteriorating because I've lived in the US for all my life so I only have my family to listen to...they all talk in Persian all the time so I don't get to hear many other dialects other than that of Afghanistan.

    :) :D
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Hi

    Lezzat comes from the infinitive verb 'lezzat bordan' which means 'to enjoy/ to like'.

    Regadrs
    Tisia
    lezzat=pleasure. I'm about 99.9% confident in saying that it is an Arabic loanword, just because it sounds like one. I have no idea how it is written in Persian, but I'm guessing that it's probably going to be written with an Arabic form of "z" (what with there being 4 different ways of writing "z" in the Perso-Arabic alphabet) "Lezzat bordan"= literally, "to take pleasure"

    Qorbunet, Bienvenidos Jaan,
    Kaveh
    Thanks.

    We use the same word in Urdu. It means the same thing too :)
    The immediate example I can think of is in the context of commiting sins.
    If we want to say something like "There is a lot of pleasure/excitement in commiting sins", we would use the word "lazzat"
     

    DrLindenbrock

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi, Bienvenidos,
    lezzat=pleasure. I'm about 99.9% confident in saying that it is an Arabic loanword, just because it sounds like one. I have no idea how it is written in Persian, but I'm guessing that it's probably going to be written with an Arabic form of "z" (what with there being 4 different ways of writing "z" in the Perso-Arabic alphabet) "Lezzat bordan"= literally, "to take pleasure"
    In Arabic it's لذة so it must be لذت in Persian.
    I don't know if it's a common word in Arabic (I don't think so) but another word from the same root is very common: لذيذ , meaning delicious" (normally a food or a drink).
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    In Arabic it's لذة so it must be لذت in Persian.
    I don't know if it's a common word in Arabic (I don't think so) but another word from the same root is very common: لذيذ , meaning delicious" (normally a food or a drink).
    Laziz . . . . sounds familiar. I forgot what context it's used for, but I KNOW that we use it for something. I think it may be a way of saying "precious" or "adorable". I also don't know if it's common in Arabic, but I wouldn't be surprised if the Arabs don't use it anymore. Apparently there are a lot of Arabic loanwords in various languages (Persian, Turkish and Urdu, to name a few) that, really, aren't used by Arabic-speakers of the modern day any longer.
     

    DrLindenbrock

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Apparently there are a lot of Arabic loanwords in various languages (Persian, Turkish and Urdu, to name a few) that, really, aren't used by Arabic-speakers of the modern day any longer.
    Yes you're right.
    I know that لذيذ is definitely used in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) / العربية الفصحة , but I don't know if it's used in the various dialects.
     

    Tisia

    Senior Member
    Iran, Persian, Kurdish, English, Finnish
    Hi

    Laziz is the same as 'khoshmazeh' which is 'delicious' in English. 'Laziz' is used when pointing at a delicios food, like: 'In ghazaa laziz hast' but 'laziz' is rarely used in Persian now. We would say 'In ghazaa khoshmazeh hast' (This food is delicious). In Persian grade-one books, there is one lesson about this. I don't remember well but I think there they pronounce 'lezzat' as 'lazzat'. I used to prounounce the word 'tarjameh' (translation) as 'tarjomeh' which is more common in Persian but in the same text books I saw that it is pronounced the Arabic way as 'tarjameh'. These words might come from Arabic but when they come into another culture they take on another sound. For me it is easier and less energy-consuming :) to say 'lezzat' and 'tarjomeh' than 'lazzat' and 'tarjameh'.


    Regards
    Tisia
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In Arabic it's لذة so it must be لذت in Persian.
    I don't know if it's a common word in Arabic (I don't think so) but another word from the same root is very common: لذيذ , meaning delicious" (normally a food or a drink).
    Yes, the word ladhídh (dh= th in "that") is an Arabic word meaning delicious. It's mostly, if not solely, used with food, but we don't use it much with this meaning in colloquial Arabic of Egypt; we use it to describe "sweet" people :) A nice, agreable person would be ladhídh (feminine: ladhídha, plural: lodhádh).

    The word ladh-dha لذة means pleasure. It's used in formal/classical/MSA Arabic more than in colloquial. It can mean pleasure (as in sexual context) or sweet taste لذة الطعم ladh-dhatu' Ta3m.



    Moderator note:
    This thread is very interesting, and I myself enjoyed it a lot, but I hope we won't go too much off-topic.
    For those interested in discussing the pronounciation or meaning of other terms (like tarjama, tarjuma...) please open a new thread.
     
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