Persian: is آ/â in آرامیدن/ârâmidan (to relax/be calm) a verb forming prefix?

PersoLatin

Senior Member
UK
Persian - Iran
Is آ/â a verb forming prefix in the verb آرامیدن/ârâmidan (to relax)?

There are many verbs in Persian that start with آ/â, in some e.g. آرامیدن/ârâmidan, آ/â seems to act like the Latin ad-(adjoin, avert), or en-(enact, enamour), where رام/râm means: docile, calm, amenable, is that plausible?
 
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  • InfiniteDays

    New Member
    Persian
    That's very likely. I had also heard that ârâm is the present tense conjugation of âramidan. The change from past tense 'a' to present tense 'â' can be seen in some other verbs like âgahidan (present tense âgâh, to announce). or middle Persian âzardan (present tense âzâr, to hurt). If you look at it that way then it is from â + ramidan (un+startle). I think that's also possible.
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    If you look at it that way then it is from â + ramidan (un+startle). I think that's also possible.
    â can only have a verbal function here, I understand what you are saying is relation to other words e.g. mordâd/mortal. amordâd/immortal but ram is the opposite râm anyway, I don't see â + ram as un+startle/settled/râm i.e.double negative => positive.
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    The (Old and Middle Persian) negative prefix is a (short vowel). ā (long vowel) is a preverb. They are not the same!
    Thanks for confirming that fdb, I wasn't sure of that as in modern Persian occasionally you see the ā (long vowel) used in place of the negative prefix e.g. âmordâd for amordâd, which can only be for stylistic rather than etymological reasons.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Avestan amərətāt-, Middle Persian amurdād means “immortality” (not “immortal”), and is used really only as the name of one of the seven amesha spentas and of the month and day named after him. The NP continuation is murdād (with regular loss of initial /a/). I have never seen “āmurdād”; it looks to me like pseudo-Pahlavi.
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Middle Persian amurdād means “immortality” (not “immortal”),
    Thank you, do we know what "immortal" is, when amurdād means “immortality”?

    I know this off topic fdb but I have always wanted to ask this question and I am happy to create a thread, so an indication will be good enough before I do that.

    Is the suffix -dād, present in many Persian words, a cognate of the Latin -dad/-ité/-ity?
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Thank you, do we know what "immortal" is, when amurdād means “immortality”?
    anōš, anōšag, amarg, all literally “without death, whose death is not”. ōš and marg are both "death".

    Is the suffix -dād, present in many Persian words, a cognate of the Latin -dad/-ité/-ity?
    Yes, Indo-Iranian -tāt- is cognate with the Latin abstract suffix -tāt.
     

    InfiniteDays

    New Member
    Persian
    The old and middle Persian negative prefix -a is almost entirely lost and never used but in the words where it is seen, it has become the long -ā. āsaqdeh: ā + saxte (from saxtan/sanjidan): a rash decision/without thinking.
    āsoqdeh: ā + suxte: not yet burned/warm.
    And the name anushirvān is also sometimes written as ānushirvān.

    After thinking about it, I agree that it is much more likely for ā to be a verbal prefix. But it's worth noting that Dehkhda also suggests that ārām is from ā + ramidan.
     
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