Persian: Khuda hafiz or allah hafiz

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panjabigator

Senior Member
Am. English
Aziiz dost! (Dear friends?)

Which one of these phrases do you use most: /allah 7afiz/ or /Xudaa 7afiz/? In South Asia, the first is gaining popularity but I doubt it will ever supplant /Xudaa hafiz/.

Khudaa hafiz!
 
  • Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    We never use allâh neither in spoken nor in written Persian. We have xodâ for it as well as xodâvand and some other synonyms usually used in poetry e.g. parvardegâr, kerdegâr, âfarinande, âfaridegâr

    So we only say xodâ-hâfez and also xodâ-negahdâr.
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Afghanistan differs from what Alijsh has mentioned.

    1) We always say xodâ fez (I write it as fez because we don't pronounce the h or the â)

    2) Xodâvand is a fancier term that means something along the lines of Godliness or the state/kingdom of God...it's hard to explain.

    3) Parvardegâr is used frequently as well, but I can only think of an insult that we use in Afghanistan:

    Parvardegâr marg betit
    (May God give you death, as in I hope you die)

    4) Xodâ-negahdâr is a nice phrase but we don't say it much. It literally means God, he who takes care of us.

    5) And the BIGGEST difference, in Afghanistan we ALWAYS use allâh in spoken language!!! (Just as much as xodâ!)


    :) :D
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    An idiomatic note:

    We say Wi allâh (oui allah) a lot as "Oh God!/ Oh gosh!"

    As in I stubbed my toe and then I say, "Wi allâh!"

    Someone tells me her grandmother just fell down the stairs, "Wi allâh!"

    Etc.
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    1) We always say xodâ fez (I write it as fez because we don't pronounce the h or the â)
    We also say xodâfez in spoken Persian. xodâhâfez is bookish/written form.

    ***
    As a side note, I can add three more words for God: izad, yazdân, dâdâr. However, from all these words I said, we only use xodâ in spoken language :D

    2) Xodâvand is a fancier term that means something along the lines of Godliness or the state/kingdom of God...it's hard to explain.)
    It means God. Ferdowsi says: be nâm-e xodâvand-e jânâfarin...
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    They are two different cases. Yes we say išâllâ or its Persian translation age Xodâ bexâd (agar Xodâ bexâhad: If God wants)
    Beh omid e khodaa is used as well, isn't it? Also, enshaa allaah is used in addition to ishaallaa, if not used just as much. I've heard enshaa allaah FAR more frequently, however.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    You would only really use "inshallah" if you're Muslim or if you're an Arab.

    Parvardigaar is used in Urdu, and doesn't just mean "God", but we describe it in Urdu as "paalne waalaa" meaning "the one who looks after you", a bit like "rabb" (obviously this is suggesting God but the meaning is more than just that).
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    Parvardigaar is used in Urdu, and doesn't just mean "God", but we describe it in Urdu as "paalne waalaa" meaning "the one who looks after you", a bit like "rabb" (obviously this is suggesting God but the meaning is more than just that).
    parvardegâr is from verb parvardan which means "to foster". So it literally means what you said and suggests God. âfaridegâr, kerdegâr, dâdâr that I said above, literally mean "The Creator" something like Arabic Xâliq.
     

    MOST-WANTED

    Member
    Afghanistan
    Aziiz dost! (Dear friends?)
    Dostane Aziz ( Dear Friends )
    In Persian the noun comes before Adjective.
    The points that I want to notice.
    It is kHudaa / Allah Hafizhet

    But the last part is dropped in spoken Language.
    We have a very comman equivelant.
    Ba Amaane Khuda bashi
    but in spoken Farsi(In Afghanistan) again we drop the Bashi.
    So it is.
    Ba Amaane khuda !
    Amaan is the plural Amen (Safety).And Hafiz means also Safety.


    Probably it should be Dar Amaane Khuda bashi.
    But I dont know why ba is used.
    Any Idea bien or others ?
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    parvardegâr is from verb parvardan which means "to foster". So it literally means what you said and suggests God. âfaridegâr, kerdegâr, dâdâr that I said above, literally mean "The Creator" something like Arabic Xâliq.
    Wow - Thanks for teaching me that!
    Nice little bit of folk etymology! :D
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    \
    Ba Amaane khuda !
    Amaan is the plural Amen (Safety).And Hafiz means also Safety.
    :D :) Yes, that's probably the most common way to say Goodbye here in Afghanistan. We pronounce it really fast and all together though, don't you think? :) :D I would write it like this:
    Bâmânexodâ

    Feel free to disagree with me, though, everyone :)

    Also, I'm not sure if this is because my family speaks Pashto or not, but we say:

    xodey pâmân --> Goodbye (as you can see the xodâ root, Persian and Pashto are very similar!)

    :D :) This forum is great! I love talking about our language!! :D
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    Well grammatically it should be Dar Amaan e Xoda.
    Why is it ba ?
    Have you heard this idiomatic expression: be amân-e xodâ sepordan. I think, be amân-e xodâ is shortened of be amân-e xodâ misepâram-at. به امان خدا سپردن - به امان خدا می*سپارمت
     
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