Persian: Life

panjabigator

Senior Member
Am. English
What is the word for life in Persian?

I know the following words from Urdu: حيات (Hayaat) and zindagii (It is very hard to type in Urdu on this comp!)
 
  • Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    I will try to use a link that Alijsh gave me to type the Persian;
    No it has been converted wrong. you should write "zndgy" to get it converted correctly. Anyway, here I write it: زندگی

    we say zendegi and our Azeri compatriots says zindagi. I wonder if it's used in other Turkic languages. I must add that its middle Persian form is zindagih.

    hayât (حیات) is a dead Arabic loanword however we didn't use it in the spoken language from the beginning. it was just used in literature sometimes.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I have never heard Hayaat either...it is only used in literature, for all I know.

    Zingagi, the way you wrote it (or rather, the azeri way) is the way we say it.
     
    No it has been converted wrong. you should write "zndgy" to get it converted correctly. Anyway, here I write it: ?????

    we say zendegi and our Azeri compatriots says zindagi. I wonder if it's used in other Turkic languages. I must add that its middle Persian form is zindagih.

    hayât (????) is a dead Arabic loanword however we didn't use it in the spoken language from the beginning. it was just used in literature sometimes.
    Hayat (accent goes where?:confused: ) is the word in Turkish, I believe, but I never heard of any word for life that sounds like Zindegi ozindagi in Turkish (though I obviously am not an authority :) ).
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Hayat (accent goes where?:confused: ) is the word in Turkish, I believe, but I never heard of any word for life that sounds like Zindegi ozindagi in Turkish (though I obviously am not an authority :) ).
    Arabic loans hayat and ömür do exist, but not zindagi or something. The word yaşam(yaşa- "to live") was coined in 1966 and it pretty much caught on! It's very probable to hear these three words nowadays.
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    hasti comes from verb hastan (to be, to exist; Spanish: estar, ser). It means existence.
    No, I don't think that's true. There is no such thing as "hastan". "Hasti" is derived from the infinitive "budan" or "to be". There is no two ways of saying "to be" in Persian as in Spanish. The conjugations would be as follows:
    1. present first person: hastam
    2. preterite first person: budam
    3. present "you" form: hasti
    4. preterite "you" form: budi
    5. present third person: hast/ast
    6. preterite third person: bud
    et cetera, et cetera.
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    I think omr=soul, or MAYBE life
    jaan (spoken Persian= jun=joon)= life essence (?) or maybe life, as well.
    Can isn't used, but the two I just mentioned are.
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    No, I don't think that's true. There is no such thing as "hastan". "Hasti" is derived from the infinitive "budan" or "to be". There is no two ways of saying "to be" in Persian as in Spanish. The conjugations would be as follows:
    Based on Persian Dictionary of Late Dr. Moin, we do have the verb hastan. Its conjugation is: hast-am/i/-/im/id/and. However, for tenses other than present, we use conjugations of verb budan. He also mentions that there has been originally a difference between verbs hastan and astan. astan is "to be" and hastan "to exist".

    This difference is still found to some extent. We say kojâ hasti and not kojâ asti, don't we? We say doxtar-e xubi ast and not hast, don't we? (However, I have noticed that dear Afghans don't pronounce initial h. I don't know if it also applies to this case or not. Please enlighten us!). The auxiliary verb for present perfect is astan (e.g. rafte ast which literally means s/he is gone). And as you see, we say hasti for existence and not asti.
     
    Can isn't used, but the two I just mentioned are.
    :) "can = jaan " it is just the Turkish orthography , "can" is pronounced as "jaan" and is a borrowed word from Persian.

    Hayat (accent goes where?:confused: ) is the word in Turkish, I believe, but I never heard of any word for life that sounds like Zindegi ozindagi in Turkish (though I obviously am not an authority :) ).

    In Turkish, there is in deed a word that might be related to Persian Zindegi, it is "zinde" and it simply means "healthy" or something alike
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    In Turkish, there is in deed a word that might be related to Persian Zindegi, it is "zinde" and it simply means "healthy" or something alike
    Zende (zenda, zinda, zinde) means "alive, live (adj.) in Persian. Its middle Persian is zindag from which zindagi (life) has been made by adding prefix -i. As I already said, this prefix makes noun from an adjective and vice versa.
     

    Chazzwozzer

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I always thought of the Turkish "can" (pronounced jaan) as "heart", but of course, it must mean "life".
    True, it also means "heart".
    In Turkish, there is in deed a word that might be related to Persian Zindegi, it is "zinde" and it simply means "healthy" or something alike
    Indeed, it is of Persian origin, meaning "fit," "sinewed" or simply "alive".
    I think omr=soul, or MAYBE life
    Turkish ömür must have the same origin as Persian omr. It has been borrowed from Arabic.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    Zende (zenda, zinda, zinde) means "alive, live (adj.) in Persian. Its middle Persian is zindag from which zindagi (life) has been made by adding prefix -i. As I already said, this prefix makes noun from an adjective and vice versa.
    Urdu too has the word /zindaa/ which means alive.
     
    :) "can = jaan " it is just the Turkish orthography , "can" is pronounced as "jaan" and is a borrowed word from Persian.




    In Turkish, there is in deed a word that might be related to Persian Zindegi, it is "zinde" and it simply means "healthy" or something alike
    Aah, but wait! I wonder if in fact the "zinde" (health) is Turkish might be more related to the French "santé" (Turkish has lots and lots of borrowed French)...

    However, French has been so influenced by so many other languages, that "santé" (from sain - healthy, sound, fit) may trace its origins back to Persian, or perhaps Arabic...?

    Good thing we found this forum, who else would be interested in all this etymology? ;) Great way not to get invited to more parties!
     
    Aah, but wait! I wonder if in fact the "zinde" (health) is Turkish might be more related to the French "santé" (Turkish has lots and lots of borrowed French)...
    Nope, it is not French :( and it means rather "fit" or "alive" than "healthy". And being interested in all this etymology does not necessarily mean not liking parties.:rolleyes:
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Based on Persian Dictionary of Late Dr. Moin, we do have the verb hastan. Its conjugation is: hast-am/i/-/im/id/and. However, for tenses other than present, we use conjugations of verb budan. He also mentions that there has been originally a difference between verbs hastan and astan. astan is "to be" and hastan "to exist".

    This difference is still found to some extent. We say kojâ hasti and not kojâ asti, don't we? We say doxtar-e xubi ast and not hast, don't we? (However, I have noticed that dear Afghans don't pronounce initial h. I don't know if it also applies to this case or not. Please enlighten us!). The auxiliary verb for present perfect is astan (e.g. rafte ast which literally means s/he is gone). And as you see, we say hasti for existence and not asti.
    Yes, we don't pronounce the intial H, so both verbs sound exactly the same to me! The difference can't even be noticed in spoken conversation. I actually found your post really interesting because of that reason; we don't pronounce the H. :) :D
     
    Nope, it is not French :( and it means rather "fit" or "alive" than "healthy". And being interested in all this etymology does not necessarily mean not liking parties.:rolleyes:
    That was not what I meant to say. It as just an attmept at humor, feeble it may have been, sorry if it did not work :eek: . But I know that my endless fascination with french nasal vowels (are there 3 or 4,) and my wonderings about the origins of words are not always subjects that inspire passionate debate amongst my local friends. That is why I like WRF: We discuss here because we are drawn to languages.
    Really, it was just a joke. It is not always easy to understand humor withour knowing someone.

    As I was wondering, perhaps the French "santé" comes from another origin than latin or other European languages. Such as the the word "zinde" that sounds very similar.
     
    That was not what I meant to say. It as just an attmept at humor, feeble it may have been, sorry if it did not work :eek: . Really, it was just a joke.
    I know, I made a joke too :) oh I really do not know anything about a possible relationship between santé and zinde but remember "santé" is a noun whereas zinde is an adjective so even if there is a relationship, this would be with French "sain" the adjective form of "santé" But again a better tranlation of "zinde" would be French "vivant" rather than santé :) Can "vivant" and "zinde" be cognates ??
     
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