Persian: Seyâ

clorin

Banned
American English
I saw while watching a reenactment of Mohammad Mosaddegh speaking to a court, he began counting a couple of reasons, but the words he used did not sound familiar to me. For example, instead of 'sevom,' he said something like 'seyâ'. Does anyone have any info on such versions of Persian numbers?
 
  • PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    It must have been seyom for sevvom (third) there's also doyom for dovvom (second), their use is not fashionable these days. They are correct, more so in my view, considering ordinal numbers are made of, number + 'om', but as 2/do & 3/sé, end in a vowel, the extra y is inevitably introduced, acting as a liaison.
     
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    clorin

    Banned
    American English
    It must have been seyom for sevvom (third) there's also doyom for dovvom (second), their use is not fashionable these days. They are correct, more so in my view, considering ordinal numbers are made of, number + 'om', but as 2/do & 3/sé, end in a vowel, the extra y is inevitably introduced, acting as a liaison.
    I just listened to it again, and you are right. Would you mind providing the Persian spelling of these numbers? Would it be دُوْیُم and سِهْیُم?
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    ^ 3/سه ends with a silent ه which is only there to ensure the é ending is pronounced correctly, I would say سِيْيُم/seyyom, you might see it as سِيُّم too, but without the diacritics which out of context might be read as 'sim'
    دُوْیُم
    This is correct.
     
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    clorin

    Banned
    American English
    Thanks, PL. For the silent ه, what about سۀیم?

    Also, do you know what the versions of the numbers would be from 4-10? Would it just be the number + یم?
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Thanks, PL. For the silent ه, what about سۀیم?
    No, definitely not.

    Also, do you know what the versions of the numbers would be from 4-10? Would it just be the number + یم?
    Ordinal numbers are formed by adding 'om' to all numbers, and we have mentioned why دو and سه are treated differently, Examples:
    panjom/پنجم - fifth (the)
    nohome/نهم - ninth
    sadom/صدم - hundredth
    do hezâr o dovvom/دوهزار و دوم - two thousand & second
    sizdahom/سيزدهم - thirteenth
     
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    clorin

    Banned
    American English
    Ordinal numbers are formed by adding 'om' to all numbers, and we have mentioned why دو and سه are treated differently, Examples:
    panjom/پنجم - fifth (the)
    nohome/نهم - ninth
    sadom/صدم - hundredth
    do hezâr o dovvom/دوهزار و دوم - two thousand & second
    sizdahom/سيزدهم - thirteenth
    Thanks, but I mean this alternate version we are discussing. Are the yom endings only for 2 and 3?
     

    PersoLatin

    Senior Member
    UK
    Persian - Iran
    Are the yom endings only for 2 and 3?
    Yes, as in:
    ...and we have mentioned why دو and سه are treated differently
    and:
    considering ordinal numbers are made of, number + 'om', but as 2/do & 3/sé, end in a vowel, the extra y is inevitably introduced, acting as a liaison.

    Summing up, the rule for all ordinal numbers in Persian is: number + 'om', even for 2 and 3, except for these two, an additional 'y' is also required and in the case of سه, the silent ه is also dropped.

    Not forgetting the more popular & modern دوم/dovvom & سوم/sevvom, where in the former, one of the soft o's (do + om) changes to a /v/, and in the latter, a /v/ is introduced.
     
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