Persian: the Jihun

Yasmeen El Araby

Senior Member
Arabic
What is "the Jihun"?

Text: "'Yes,' he said, 'the ground is all cooked between here and Mazar, but it is green again near the Jihun,' employing this word for the Oxus, and not understanding our reference to it as the Amu Darya."

Source: The Road to Oxiana by Robert Byron
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    What is "the Jihun"?

    Text: "'Yes,' he said, 'the ground is all cooked between here and Mazar, but it is green again near the Jihun,' employing this word for the Oxus, and not understanding our reference to it as the Amu Darya."

    Source: The Road to Oxiana by Robert Byron
    From Wikipedia, "The name Amu is said to have come from the medieval city of Āmul, (later, Chahar Joy/Charjunow, and now known as Türkmenabat), in modern Turkmenistan, with Darya being the Persian word for "lake" and Amu being "uncle". Medieval Arabic and Islamic sources call the river Jayhoun (Arabic: جَـيْـحُـوْن, romanized: h; also Jaihun, Jayhoon, or Dzhaykhun) which is derived from Gihon, the biblical name for one of the four rivers of the Garden of Eden.[6][7]"

    So, Jaihuun is the Arabic equivalent for Amu Darya.
     
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