Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Hindi: burst (someone's bubble)

Alfaaz

Senior Member
English
Background:
burst someone's bubble: Fig. to destroy someone's illusion or delusion; to destroy someone's fantasy. I hate to burst your bubble, but Columbus did not discover Canada. Even if you think I am being foolish, please don't burst my bubble.
نظریات یا اُمیدوں پر پانی پھیر دینا ۔ دھوکا بے نقاب کر دینا ۔ بلبلے سے ہوا نکال دینا

Context: "Sorry to burst your bubble, but there are perhaps hundreds and thousands of people in the world who have not eaten a single morsel today while you're sitting here enjoying a feast and saying that there aren't any problems in our society! Get out of your shell and see the world around you!"

Attempt:
آپکا حباب پھاڑنے کے لئے معذرت خواہ ہوں، لیکن شائد ہزاروں لاکھوں افراد ہیں دنیا میں جننے ایک نوالا نہیں آج کھایا جبکہ آپ یہاں بیٹھے ضیافت کے مزے اڑا رہے اور که رہے ہیں کہ ہمارے معاشرے میں کوئی مسائل نہیں! اپنے خول سے نکل کر گرد و نواح کی دنیا دیکھیں

For Persian, Google Translate gives: حباب کسی پشت سر هم

For Urdu and Hindi, Platts gives the following words for "burst": pichakna, phaaRnaa, phoRnaa, phaTnaa, phaskaanaa, tarkaana, tasnaa, chatkaana, chasnaa

  • The problem with all these seems to be that they seem to give a different meaning (than what is intended) / seem ذومعنی / wrongly sound like an innuendo or insult due to other Urdu/Hindi usages:
    • Like in a TV show, the person uses the expression and the people not familiar with the English expression say: "Hau Haaye! Amtryaa, zaleela, baar nikal! Fer assi teraa Hab-baab paaRne aaN! waDa angrez/angrezni da bachcha te dekho....walaiti khabees! dafa ho! "
      • Similarly, aap ka Habaab phaaRne ke liye ma'zarat sounds awkward...just as cheer phaaR sounded weird for surgery...?!
        • What do forum members think?
Questions: How would 'burst" and this expression be translated in your language? Are there other idioms that exist and have similar meaning? For Urdu, is there a less gruesome / higher register / more sophisticated word for "burst"?
 
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  • JaiHind

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    हिंदी में मेरे विचार से:

    स्वप्न भंग करना,
    कल्पना भंग करना,
    धरातल पर लाना
     

    greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    In "burst someone's bubble", "burst" (in Hindi, फोड़ना) is not literally translated. The equivalent Hindi expression would be "भ्रम तोड़ना".
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Thanks for replying everyone!
    greatbear said:
    In "burst someone's bubble", "burst" (in Hindi, फोड़ना) is not literally translated. The equivalent Hindi expression would be "भ्रम तोड़ना".
    Yes bharam toRnaa could be used...but I was wondering how it would be literally translated for a person using similes and metaphors philosophically involving bubbles...in which case it would flow better with a literal translation.

    Example: humaari Hayaat Habaab si hai. Hum apne Habaab mein dunyaa ko dekhte hain aur dunyaa humain dekhti hai. ..... nokeeli aur talkh HaqeeqateiN kabhi kabaar hamare Habaab ko "burst" kar deti hain aur hum iHsaas ki manzil ko aakhirkaar chhuu lete haiN!

    BelligerentPacifist said:
    I believe that would be gusastagii-گستگی.
    I could not find this in online dictionaries except for this. Could you please use it in an example sentence BP SaaHib? Thanks!

    Also found نقض ...Could this work?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thanks for replying everyone!

    Yes bharam toRnaa could be used...but I was wondering how it would be literally translated for a person using similes and metaphors philosophically involving bubbles...in which case it would flow better with a literal translation.

    Example: humaari Hayaat Habaab si hai. Hum apne Habaab mein dunyaa ko dekhte hain aur dunyaa humain dekhti hai. ..... nokeeli aur talkh HaqeeqateiN kabhi kabaar hamare Habaab ko "burst" kar deti hain aur hum iHsaas ki manzil ko aakhirkaar chhuu lete haiN!


    I could not find this in online dictionaries except for this. Could you please use it in an example sentence BP SaaHib? Thanks!

    Also found نقض ...Could this work?

    I think gb's "bharam toRnaa" (or bharam kholnaa) is an excellent way to express the meaning behind "bursting the bubble". If you are keen on a more literal translation, then why are you bent on using "Habaab" (which is a rather literary word) and not going for the simple "bulbulaa"?

    "naqz" is more a "breach" than a "bursting". BP's word is "gusistagii" from the verb "gusistan" with past participle "gusistah".

    "tafjiir" means "bursting" if this is of any help.
     
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    greatbear

    Banned
    India - Hindi & English
    Yes bharam toRnaa could be used...but I was wondering how it would be literally translated for a person using similes and metaphors philosophically involving bubbles...in which case it would flow better with a literal translation.

    Each language (and associated culture) has its own similes and metaphors: I don't see why would someone need a "literal translation". Would you translate "it's raining cats and dogs" as "kutte aur billiyoN kii barsaat ho rahii hai" in Hindi/Urdu?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    If you are still after a literal version of a bubble bursting..

    "Sorry to burst your bubble..."

    Habaab-tarkaniiii kii ma3zirat... (tarkiidan= phaTnaa, tarkaaniidan = phoRnaa)

    Here is a shi3r by Habib Jalali, which talks about the air imprisoned in a bubble (insaan ke badan kii saaNs)..

    kab tak rahe gaa ruuH pih pairahan-i-badan
    kab tak havaa asiir rahe gii Habaab meN
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Thanks for all the replies everyone!
    QURESHPOR said:
    If you are keen on a more literal translation, then why are you bent on using "Habaab" (which is a rather literary word) and not going for the simple "bulbulaa"?
    That's exactly why, because it's a "rather literary word" ہستی اپنی حباب كی سی ہے , یہ نمائش سراب كی سی ہے. It also allows for alliteration/etc. with Hayaat, humara, hum, Haseen, etc. as I tried showing in my example above and rhymes with words like shabaab. I was thinking it would give the whole thing a more philosophical/serious feel in comparison to bulbulaa which has a more playful feeling (in my opinion, which others might disagree with...)! Chaar dinna di dunyaa ae....paani ka bulbulaa!
    BelligerentPacifist said:
    My pleasure. Here's a simple one:
    ٹائر بلند ہوائی فشار کے باعث گسستہ ہوا
    Thanks! As always you have provided such a unique and artistic grouping of words, even in this "simple one"!

    greatbear said:
    Each language (and associated culture) has its own similes and metaphors: I don't see why would someone need a "literal translation". Would you translate "it's raining cats and dogs" as "kutte aur billiyoN kii barsaat ho rahii hai" in Hindi/Urdu?
    Agree! However, as I quoted the couplet above in Urdu below QP's quote....hasti apni Habaab ki si hai, yeh numaaish saraab ki si hai....and as QP SaaHib has also said.....Habaab is used in literature, so I thought it would tie in better with the series of metaphors for life/existence/people. This idea could be continued with "bursting" representing multiple things, events, or stages of life, which could be used to paint a picture of life with similes and metaphors...;
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu

    Chaar dinna di dunyaa ae....paani ka bulbulaa!

    Thanks! As always you have provided such a unique and artistic grouping of words, even in this "simple one"!

    Alfaaz SaaHib, can you tell me which kind of language or dialect are these words? There is nothing against the usage of bulbulaa here and infact it is used figuratively, also in this sense.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    marrish said:
    Alfaaz SaaHib, can you tell me which kind of language or dialect are these words? There is nothing against the usage of bulbulaa here and infact it is used figuratively, also in this sense.
    marrish SaaHib, I'm afraid I didn't quite understand your question, but will say that both words can be and probably are already considered equal, however in my opinion (as I even stated above) one seems to have a more happy and playful feel to me. This might not be a "correct" opinion...
    Alfaaz said:
    (in my opinion, which others might disagree with...)!
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    If I am not mistaken Alfaaz SaaHib, I believe marrish SaaHib was referring to..

    "Chaar dinna di dunyaa ae....paani ka bulbulaa! "

    I think the implication is that this appears to be "khichRii"!
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    QURESHPOR said:
    "Chaar dinna di dunyaa ae....paani ka bulbulaa! "
    I think the implication is that this appears to be "khichRii"!
    OK, I see! Or more like pioneer "hip Urdu/Punjabi/etc. rap!":)
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Alfaaz SaaHib, QP SaaHib got the meaning of my question right, that is why I quoted your "grouping of words" together with the adjacent statement which suggests your words are spotted somewhere in artistic context or they possibly have their source in some dialect or transitional register. I'm afraid I'm not using the right terms. Or maybe this word-grouping is artistic on its own, providing a pleasant chance to drift about the 'bulbulaa' topic! :)
     
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