Persian: Walls have ears

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
Persian seems to have a (funny) expression like "Walls have mouse and mouse has ears" or something the like. How come there is a mouse in the expression? Is there some logic to it?
 
  • truce

    Senior Member
    Persian
    This proverb is used to tell someone to be careful of what they say as there are informants all around.
    The mouse in proverb is assumed as informant.
    When it is deserted and you feel safe and you talk in an imprudent way, it is not that safe as it seems to be.
    Although you see no one around but walls, there are mouse holes in the walls in which the mice hear what you say.

    (Be careful!:warning: You are being eavesdropped secretly. The walls are bugged with mice! :))
     
    Last edited:

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Persian seems to have a (funny) expression like "Walls have mouse and mouse has ears" or something the like. How come there is a mouse in the expression? Is there some logic to it?
    How with the logic of "walls have ears"? Doesn't the logic of "There's mice in the wall and they have ears" or "There's a mouse in the house and it has ears, the mouse", appear sounder? Mice after all sit in walls and do have ears while walls don't.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Haha, you might be right indeed. I had not even thought of the metaphorical aspect of walls, just thought the idea of the mouse so very funny… We are used to walls with ears, not to mice in walls… ;-)
     

    Pussykat

    Banned
    English-USA
    Persian seems to have a (funny) expression like "Walls have mouse and mouse has ears" or something the like. How come there is a mouse in the expression? Is there some logic to it?
    Are you talking about دیوار موش دارد، موش ھم گوش دارد?
     
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