Persian: you are so pretty!

  • Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Hmm...interesting:

    In the Afghan dialect, "xeyli" is really formal. We would say:

    tu bisyâr maqbul asti
    (TOO-beesyar-MUGHbool-US-tee)
     

    MOST-WANTED

    Member
    Afghanistan
    Here is the Afghan Farsi posibilities

    Tu kheyle khosh-shekel Asti

    Tu besyaar Muqbool Asti

    Tu besyaar zebah asti

    Tu besyaar qashang asti

    Tu besyaar khobsoort asti ( comman in south )

    The top 3 are very comman inside kabul,But we have more than 20 possibility for a single sentence in afghanistan. Like hazaragi, badakhshi and others.
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    That means pretty/beautiful in the Laghman/Kabul dialect. As MOST WANTED said there are many, many possibilities.
     

    Bleet

    New Member
    Iran Swedish
    For your information, besyaar is hardly used in Farsi spoken in Iran. We use xeyli or cheghad. "ch" is pronnounced as the "ch" in "ch"a-"ch"ing.
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    "Xeyli" is used in Afghan Persian as well but it is a degree more formal than "bisyâr". :) Chances are that the person whom vanilla kiss is writing to is from Iran, though, so Bleet makes a great point. :)

    :D Saludos
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    We don't use the phrases you said in the spoken language but "to xeyli xoshgeli" (x is pronounced as ch in Loch-ness; German Buch)
    This looks extremely formal to me; I think Afghan Persian doesn't use such formality in conversation (or at least among young people it's not used much), or maybe it's just my region.
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    This looks extremely formal to me; I think Afghan Persian doesn't use such formality in conversation (or at least among young people it's not used much), or maybe it's just my region.
    This thread gave me an interesting experience. you know, your "Tu besyaar qashang asti" sounds bookish to us (not even formal). We never use "besyâr" in the spoken language. And as far as I have noticed, you have the same case with "xayli" :D

    maqbul is a dated word and if ever used in written language it means "accepted" and not "beautiful, pretty or so"
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    How can you say these phrases in Farsi?
    2. What have you been upto lately? [female - female]
    3. You too look so cute together!
    I see "To che qadr xoshgeli/qashangi!" or "Che qadr khoshgeli!" as the best translation for this context, because "To xeyli/kheyli . . . . ." in actuality would mean "You're very pretty," not "You're so pretty." In Iranian Persian, at least, "so" would translate to "che qadr".

    By the way, none of you seemed to have answered vanilla's other questions.

    2. What've you been up to, lately= "Che khabaraa/xabaraa?" Which literally translates to "What news?" and is the equivalent to the English phrase "What's up?"

    3. I don't really know how to translate this one. My guess would be (although this is probably wrong because I've only heard this being said about a dress or a certain item "becoming" someone (i.e. "That dress suits you/becomes you.") I think that the aforementioned would translate thusly: Che qadr beh hamdigeh miyaayin!

    Oh, and I noticed that you wrote "female to female", specifically, as if you wanted the particular conjugation for that particular interpersonal communication. FYI: Persian doesn't have gender in its grammatical structure. There is no "he" or "she" or "el" or "la" (as in Spanish) or genders to each noun. Everything, (in verbs, nouns, pronouns, et cetera) is considered as an "it" when it comes to the third person in Persian.
     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    I anticipated the word /khoobsuurat/ to be in there.
    Surat/soorat is an Arabic loanword, as you may know, so I think attempts are made to minimize the usage of Arabic where it's possible. Instead of "khubsurat" I've heard "khubchehreh", with "chehreh" being the pure Persian word for "face". I'm pretty sure that it's rarely used, though.
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    I see "To che qadr xoshgeli/qashangi!" or "Che qadr khoshgeli!" as the best translation for this context, because "To xeyli/kheyli . . . . ." in actuality would mean "You're very pretty," not "You're so pretty." In Iranian Persian, at least, "so" would translate to "che qadr".

    By the way, none of you seemed to have answered vanilla's other questions.

    2. What've you been up to, lately= "Che khabaraa/xabaraa?" Which literally translates to "What news?" and is the equivalent to the English phrase "What's up?"

    3. I don't really know how to translate this one. My guess would be (although this is probably wrong because I've only heard this being said about a dress or a certain item "becoming" someone (i.e. "That dress suits you/becomes you.") I think that the aforementioned would translate thusly: Che qadr beh hamdigeh miyaayin!

    Oh, and I noticed that you wrote "female to female", specifically, as if you wanted the particular conjugation for that particular interpersonal communication. FYI: Persian doesn't have gender in its grammatical structure. There is no "he" or "she" or "el" or "la" (as in Spanish) or genders to each noun. Everything, (in verbs, nouns, pronouns, et cetera) is considered as an "it" when it comes to the third person in Persian.
    What is the geli mean in xoshgeli? And qashangi?

    Qadr in Panjabi/Urdu/Hindi mean extent or type.
     

    Alijsh

    Senior Member
    Persian - Iran
    Surat/soorat is an Arabic loanword, as you may know, so I think attempts are made to minimize the usage of Arabic where it's possible. Instead of "khubsurat" I've heard "khubchehreh", with "chehreh" being the pure Persian word for "face". I'm pretty sure that it's rarely used, though.
    That attempt doesn't apply to this case and as far as I have seen, it's a matter with written Persian and not spoken.

    ***
    we have had xoš-chehre/a (hu-chihr -> hojir, xojir) even in Middle Persian. In Persian, we have also xub-ru, zibâ-ru (both in potery), xoš-simâ, xoš-qiyâfe, xoš-surat, etc. I can say that in some regions, they use some of xoš- words with xub-. So it's not something new (new coinage) but a regional register.
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    xoš-simâ, xoš-qiyâfe, xoš-surat, etc. I can say that in some regions, they use some of xoš- words with xub-. So it's not something new (new coinage) but a regional register.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
    :D
    In Afghanistan, the word for face is ru. xoš works with some words while xub with others.

    Let me think of examples:

    xošbwi --> good smelling, something that smells good
    xošmaza --> good tasting, something that tastes good


     

    Abbassupreme

    Senior Member
    United States, English, Persian
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
    :D
    In Afghanistan, the word for face is ru. xoš works with some words while xub with others.

    Let me think of examples:

    xošbwi --> good smelling, something that smells good
    xošmaza --> good tasting, something that tastes good


    :D Same words in Iranian Persian:

    xoshbu/khoshbu and xoshmazzeh/khoshmazzeh
     
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