person- obsolete/ outdated/ old-fashioned

kispalikee

Member
Hungarian
Hi everonye,

I'm a bit counfused about which word to use to refer to a person who no longer keeps track of new ideas. Is he obsolete/ outdated or old-fashioned? I mean to describe some teachers who are quite old and not open to any novelty.
Thank you in advance.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Can you give us the complete sentence in which you would use the phrase, so that we can have a specific example to discuss?
     

    kispalikee

    Member
    Hungarian
    Ok, Scholiast, I get your point, and now I am totally confused. So, if anyone can come up with a better expression than old-fashioned is welcome.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Teachers who no longer follow new findings, may easily become obsolete/ outdated

    Teachers may refuse to move with the times; they may use out-dated teaching methods, but they may still be good teachers. I don't really know how you could describe them other than as "old-fashioned". Such teachers may easily become "out of touch"? - "unemployed"?:eek:
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Ok, Scholiast, I get your point, and now I am totally confused. So, if anyone can come up with a better expression than old-fashioned is welcome.
    I think you missed the point. Scholiast admitted to being "old-fashioned", but doesn't wish to be described as "obsolete".
     

    kispalikee

    Member
    Hungarian
    Yes, Andygc, I got it, and I understood that being old-fashioned is not a negative term, whereas obsolete is. That's why old-fashioned doesn't fit in my context as I wanted to express something negative, the kind of teacher who's not open to any novelty, and even the old methods proved to be wrong they keep using them because they don't care. I understand that being old-fashioned doesn't entail this behaviour.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, Andygc, I got it, and I understood that being old-fashioned is not a negative term, whereas obsolete is. That's why old-fashioned doesn't fit in my context as I wanted to express something negative, the kind of teacher who's not open to any novelty, and even the old methods proved to be wrong they keep using them because they don't care. I understand that being old-fashioned doesn't entail this behaviour.
    Ah, I see that I misunderstood you. In which case I'd use a few more words "Mr Jones is an old-fashioned teacher, out of touch and stuck in his ways". I don't think we have a single phrase to wrap all that up.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Stuck in his ways"? I tend to hear '"set in his ways" or "an old stick- in- the-mud". "Set in their ways" is more of a euphemism, a bit less pejorative than "out of touch", I think.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Sure, here is my sentence: Teachers who no longer follow new findings, may easily become obsolete/ outdated.
    It sounds here as if you are trying to say the same thing in both parts of the sentence, whereas from the sentence structure we would expect the second part of the sentence to be a consequence of the first.

    It would make sense to say 'Teachers who do not keep their knowledge up to date are letting their students down' or 'are not doing their job properly'.

    It is the teacher's knowledge or instruction which becomes obsolete or out of date, not the teacher.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Stuck in his ways"? I tend to hear '"set in his ways" or "an old stick- in- the-mud". "Set in their ways" is more of a euphemism, a bit less pejorative than "out of touch", I think.
    Set, fixed, stuck: I'm easy on whichever you prefer. Whichever you chose, it doesn't mean "out of touch", it means "unwilling to change".
     

    kispalikee

    Member
    Hungarian
    I also liked out of touch though, so my final sentence is:

    "Teachers who no longer follow new findings, can easily become out of touch and can easily cause disillusionment in their students towards the given subject."


    I hope it doesn't sound weird or anything. I avoided using let their students down as it's a formal letter.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Wandle gave you a good suggestion in post #14: Teachers who do not keep their knowledge up to date...

    We aren't really supposed to proofread the whole sentence, but you might want to open another thread to discuss the use of "disillusionment".
     

    EzeMza

    Member
    Español - Argentina
    :arrow: New question added to previous thread. Cagey, moderator

    Hi guys, I have a doubt with the words Outdated/Old-fashioned. I don´t know if both have the same meaning or they should be used in different contexts. For example in this case:
    - He prefers to send a letter instead an e-mail. He is so outdated.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello, EzeMza.

    I'd use 'old-fashioned' for the reason given by cyberpedant in post #4: 'old-fashioned' may be used for people, while 'obsolete' used for things.
     
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