Personal pronouns in Korean

Katsu

Member
Spain, Spanish
Hello! I've started learning Korean by my own and from now on I'll often ask you for advice and help here, if you don't mind me to. Which are the most common personal pronouns for 'I, you', etc., in Korean? The only textbook I have so far is a rather simple travel phrasebook, and what I've found there is a bit confusing. For example, for 'I' I've found:

내 / 제 (translated as 'I', informal and polite)

나 / 저 (translated as 'me', informal and polite)

Searching here in the WR dictionary, I find 나 as the only result.

To begin with, which one should I use in order to start making my first own sentences, such as 'I am a student', 'I like music' and so on?

Thank you in advance for your answers, and please excuse me if my questions are too simple or 'silly', but my level is still almost zero.
 
  • kenjoluma

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Don't you Spanish people also have something like this?

    I don't know Spanish, but I heard you also have 'tu' and 'usted' or something. (I really do not know Spanish)

    When you think you are dealing with someone you think you have to use 'tu', then stick to '나' and '내'.
    When you think you should use 'usted' to someone, then you can use '저' and '제'.

    In Spanish, you have to choose either 'tu' and 'usted', but in Korean, not only 2nd person but also 1st person should be modified accordingly.
     

    Katsu

    Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Don't you Spanish people also have something like this?

    I don't know Spanish, but I heard you also have 'tu' and 'usted' or something. (I really do not know Spanish)

    When you think you are dealing with someone you think you have to use 'tu', then stick to '나' and '내'.
    When you think you should use 'usted' to someone, then you can use '저' and '제'.

    In Spanish, you have to choose either 'tu' and 'usted', but in Korean, not only 2nd person but also 1st person should be modified accordingly.

    Yes, in Spanish it is exactly as you say. ^^

    So I guess in Korean the usage is more or less the same, but my question is more about the difference between the 'I' and 'me' pronouns, rather than their level of formality or politeness. I suppose that, for example, if I want to say 'I am a student', I should use the 'subject' pronouns, 내 or 제, and in, for example, 'He gave me a book' I should use the 'object' pronouns, 나 and 저, right?

    Thank you again for your help! ^_^
     

    chifladoporlosidiomas

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    Na = I (informal)
    nae = my (contraction of na ui)
    Na reul/ nal = me (direct object)
    na ege/naege = (to) me

    Jeo = I (humble/formal)
    Je = my (contraction of jeo ui)
    Jeo reul/jeol = me (direct object)
    Jeo ege/jege = (to) me

    I am a student =
    1) Naega (na ga) haksaeng ie yo. (Polite style)
    2) Jeo neun (jeon) haksaeng imnida. (Formal Style)

    He gave me a book:
    1) (Geu neun) naege (na ege) chaegeul jueosseo yo.
    2) Jeo ege chaegeul jueosseumnida.

    I hope this helped. Sorry for the lack of Hangeul
     

    wildsunflower

    Senior Member
    Korean & English (Canada)
    I recommend learning Korean in Hangeul.

    I am a student =
    1) 나는 학생입니다./ 나는 학생이에요. ("내가 학생이에요." (Naega (na ga) haksaeng ie yo.) is understood but sounds awkward.)
    2) 저는 학생입니다./저는 학생이에요.

    He gave me a book:
    1) 그는/그가 내게/나에게 책을 주었어요/주었읍니다. (Geu neun naege (na ege) chaegeul jueosseo yo.)
    2) 그는/그가 제게/저에게 책을 주었어요/주었읍니다. (Jeo ege chaegeul jueosseumnida.)
     
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