pervade

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  • james.zeng

    Member
    Chinese
    Will this be better? "A consensus, that Europe had to attack fundamental issues and stop merely putting out the brushfire of the moment, was pervading the summit meeting on Sunday!"
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    "If you are on a diet allowing you 300 calories per day, the thought of food will pervade your every waking moment".

    (I think the late P. Samuelson wrote this, or something very similar, in one of the countless editions of his "Economics").

    Best.

    GS
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Like Copyright, I find "pervading" a strange choice with "consensus":(.

    But I think "pervade" was intended to have its dictionary meaning, whyflies:
    pervade/pəˈveɪd/
    ▶verb spread or be present throughout; suffuse.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Sorry, Copy.
    Meaning?
    I was just suggesting that "thoughts of food" and "pervade" make a lot more sense to me than "consensus" and "pervade" -- so I was asking (without asking) if you were offering your quote in response to my surprise at seeing "consensus" and "pervade" together. :)
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Understood, Copy.

    Well, if we take "pervade" to mean "be present throughout" I have no difficulty in conjuring up the notion that "consensus pervaded the meeting" (ie there was this air of consensus that was present throughout the meeting, or "Consensus was in the air").

    I should add that in my language we would use the verb "<<English only, please.>>", which shares with English "pervade" the same Latin origins.

    Best :)

    GS
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Understood, Copy.

    Well, if we take "pervade" to mean "be present throughout" I have no difficulty in conjuring up the notion that "consensus pervaded the meeting" (ie there was this air of consensus that was present throughout the meeting, or "Consensus was in the air").

    I should add that in my language we would use the verb "pervàdere", which shares with English "pervade" the same Latin origins.

    Best :)

    GS
    Now that's a case of, why didn't someone take a look at the WR dictionary before posting :cool: ... Pervade "spread or be present throughout; suffuse."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Now that's a case of, why didn't someone take a look at the WR dictionary before posting :cool: ... Pervade "spread or be present throughout; suffuse."
    Someone did, in post 5 – someone who also considered general usage in addition to definition. It certainly looks right – it just doesn't sound right (to me). We all have different ears and I was just sharing the shape of mine. :cool:
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Needless to say, I don't find this sentence very strange at all, though I admit it contains a mild illiteracy. I think a wish for a consensus can pervade a meeting very easily, and this is clearly what the writer means.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Good point TT - yes, I'm sure you're right that the writer was using "consensus" to mean "air of consensus" or "desire for consensus" or "feeling of consensus".
     
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