Peter <lost> interest in football completely

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi teachers,
This is just to explain the meaning to the students, not to change the word for the phrase.
Information: Peter got a bad experience at a stadium with a keen supporter of the other football team.
Question:
Would "stop to have" be an explanation for "lost" in the sentence below?
You may think that Peter lost interest in football completely, but he didn’t.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Yes, that's a gerund.

    Compare:

    He stopped to smoke. (=He stopped and smoked. The purpose of his stopping was smoking).
    He stopped smoking. (= He quit smoking/He didn't smoke anymore.)

    Be careful with "stop".


    PS: It is a gerund, isn't it?
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    The meaning is "He stopped to smoke, let's say, for a few hours and then smoked again". Right?
    TL
    Not really.

    He stopped (walking, driving, etc) to smoke.

    He stopped in order to smoke. (The "to" shows the purpose of stopping and means "in order to". It's not about smoking again. He stopped doing whatever he was doing, especially moving, in order to smoke.)
     

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    Then with "He stooped to smoke", the intention was not to quit smoking just to stop. Right?
    Not "stooped", but "stopped", TL. Yes, "He stopped to smoke" doesn't have anything to do with quitting smoking but means, on thew contrary, that he stopped in order to smoke. The intention (or the purpose of his stopping) was to smoke.
     
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