Peugeot, Renault

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by AndrasBP, Nov 24, 2018.

  1. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    Hello,

    How do you pronounce the French car brands Peugeot and Renault in your language? How close is your pronunciation to the French original?

    I think the Hungarian versions are fairly accurate, we say /'pøʒo:/ and /'røno:/, as if they were spelt "pözsó" and "rönó".
    We don't have a problem with /ø/ or /ʒ/, but we always stress words on the first syllable, and the /o/ is always long at the end of a word in Hungarian.

    I've heard an Irishman pronounce Renault as /'renɔlt/, but I don't know if this is common there or it was just an idiosyncratic mispronunciation.
     
  2. Dymn

    Dymn Senior Member

    I personally pronounce /pəu̯ˈʒɔt/ and /reˈnol/ so the former as if I read peujot in Catalan and the latter renol in Spanish. I have no idea why the difference honestly.
     
  3. Sardokan1.0

    Sardokan1.0 Senior Member

    Sardigna
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Italian are pronounced something like "pejó" and "renó"
     
  4. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek they're [peˈzɔ] & [ɾeˈnɔ]
     
  5. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    Thanks for the replies. I've copied the following from Wikipedia:
    Peugeot (UK: /ˈpɜːʒoʊ/, US: /puːˈʒoʊ/; French: [pøʒo])

    If that's correct, there are at least five different vowels that are used in various languages for the first syllable of "Peugeot".
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  6. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    Lorraine in France
    English (US Northeast)
    [Pu 'ʒou] and [Rɪ 'nou] would be widespread in the US but there is much variation depending on the person and their desire to make it sound French. Sometimes the first vowels could be reduced to schwas, sometimes not.
     
  7. Määränpää

    Määränpää Senior Member

    Finnish
    In Finnish they are pronounced as if they were written in IPA:
    /'peu.ge.ot/
    /'re.nɑult/
     
  8. Stoggler

    Stoggler Senior Member

    Sussex, GBR
    UK English
    And /ˈɹɛnəʊ/ for Renault in British English.
     
  9. Yendred Senior Member

    Paris
    Français - France
    Yes, they are accurate. This is exactly how we pronounce them in French (except maybe for the 'r' in Renault which is the French 'r').

    Prononciation de Peugeot : Comment prononcer Peugeot en Français, Allemand, Espagnol, Néerlandais, Portugais, Anglais, Italien, Suédois
    Prononciation de Renault : Comment prononcer Renault en Français, Portugais, Anglais, Néerlandais, Espagnol, Turc, Allemand, Italien, Suédois

    Generally, in French, words are stressed on the penultimate syllable. Since /'pøʒo:/ and /'røno:/ have 2 syllables, I guess we stress them as you do in Hungarian.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  10. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    That's quite surprising. Do you also pronounce French place names and personal names like that?
    What about "de Gaulle" or "Toulouse"?
    My French is basic, but I've always thought it is common knowledge that French words are stressed on the last syllable. A Hungarian certainly hears the words stressed on the second syllable when said by a native French speaker. Here on the forum, I've seen a number of posts saying things like "the French don't hear it that way" or "the French have no idea where their word stress is". At first I found this very strange, but it seems that it's because the difference between a stressed and unstressed syllable is less marked in French than in English, Spanish, Italian or Russian, so many French speakers perceive their syllables to be equally stressed.
    This phenomenon deserves a separate thread, perhaps.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 25, 2018
  11. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    Lorraine in France
    English (US Northeast)
    All final syllables of an utterance are longer and slightly accented. So the last syllable in Renault is accented if it is placed as the last word in the sentence: je vais acheter une reNAULT.

    Otherwise in other positions no syllable is accented or it may even seem at times that it could be the first syllable depending on the rhytnm of a given sentence : Les Renaults sont bien plus performantes que les PeuGEOTS.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2018
  12. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    In Yendred's first link (post #9) there's an Argentinian pronunciation which sounds like your Catalan version, presumably because /ʒ/ is no problem for Argentinians as their <ll> is pronounced so, is that right?
     
  13. Dymn

    Dymn Senior Member

    Yep, both ll and y are pronounced /ʒ/ in Argentinian Spanish, except for the younger generation (e.g. current footballers) who devoice it to /ʃ/.

    All Hungarian words are stressed in the first syllable, right? It shocks me how native speakers of languages with no stress or fixed stress can still perceive this difference and talk about it. For example I am tone-deaf and can barely hear it in Mandarin, so in a similar fashion I imagine you to be stress-deaf.
     
  14. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    Yes. We share this feature with Czech and Slovak.

    It can indeed be a problem for a Hungarian to produce a non-initial stressed syllable when learning a foreign language, but when a foreigner says a name or a Hungarian word with the wrong stress, it just sounds totally foreign, it's just "off". I've heard a number of French people speaking or trying to speak Hungarian, and their word-final stress is so conspicuous.

    .

    I think I'll open a new thread about word stress problems.:)
     
  15. bibax Senior Member

    Czechlands
    Czech (Prague)
    In Czech, without making an effort, we say /'pɛʒot/ and /'rɛnolt/, as if they were spelt "pežot", "renolt" in Czech. Some people don't pronounce the final t but only in the nominative singular (in other cases there is an ending after t).

    gen. sing. Peugeota /'pɛʒota/, Renaulta /'rɛnolta/,
    dat. loc. sing. Peugeotu /'pɛʒotu/, Renaultu /'rɛnoltu/,
    nom. plur. Peugeoty /'pɛʒotɪ/, Renaulty /'rɛnoltɪ/,
    voc. sing. Peugeote /'pɛʒotɛ/, Renaulte /'rɛnoltɛ/, quite rare (můj milý Peugeote! = o my beloved Peugeot! could say Columbo to his car),
    etc.

    Czech has neither /ø/ nor /y/, we pronounce /ɛ/ and /ɪ/ instead, even in the case of the surnames of German origin that are common in our country (König /'kɛ:nɪk/, Mühlfeit /'mɪ:lfaɪt/).
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  16. mardabo

    mardabo Member

    Illinois
    American English - Midwest
    In America we usually hear Peugeot pronounced PYOO-ZHO.
    That is how I pronounce it as well.
    But don't be surprised if you hear it as POO-JEE-AHT.
    Renault is usually pronounced ruh-NAWLT.
    I pronounce it ray-NO.
     
  17. Määränpää

    Määränpää Senior Member

    Finnish
    I think that in the case of Peugeot and Renault, the "uneducated" pronunciation has become the standard pronunciation in Finland because the cars are popular and everybody talks about them.

    With De Gaulle, I'd say both pronunciations are possible. With Toulouse, only the French-inspired one.
     
  18. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    The cars are also popular in Hungary but we use the "Frenchy" pronunciation, so there seems to be a different attitude to foreign words in Finland.
    Most Hungarians have no idea about French pronunciation rules, very few people study the language and they're shocked to see that the "Hungarian" word randevú is originally spelled rendez-vous. They don't even recognize it. Still, nobody says "Peugeot" the Finnish way.:)
     
  19. TheCrociato91 Senior Member

    Brescia, Italy
    Italian - Northern Italy
    This thread, particularly the pronunciation of "Peugeot", reminded me of a video I watched of an Italian guy interviewing two French girls. One of the questions (timestamp: 2:18-3:02) was indeed on how to pronounce some French words which are also used in Italian.

     
  20. Yendred Senior Member

    Paris
    Français - France
    Nice video! The explanation about how to use a bidet is quite spicy ;)
     
  21. Dymn

    Dymn Senior Member

    Should Renault be pronounced /ʁəno/, with schwa instead of /ø/? I've heard about some sort of merger between both sounds. Is this right?
     
  22. Yendred Senior Member

    Paris
    Français - France
    It's more /ʁəno/ but these slight differences depend a lot on the region and each people's habits.
     
  23. Perseas Senior Member

    Greece
    Greek
    And the respective words in Greek are "πεζό" & "ρενό".
    "πεζό(ς)" is also the Greek word for "pedestrian"!
     
  24. bibax Senior Member

    Czechlands
    Czech (Prague)
    Slightly OT:

    Peugeot is nicknamed Pažout ['paʒout] in Czech.

    Pažout is a Czech surname, rather rare and funny (meaning: a voracious man). It was used in the Czech translation of The Merry Wives of Windsor: Page (family) > Pažout, Margaret Page > Margareta Pažoutová.
     
  25. Pedro y La Torre Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English (Ireland)
    My mother pronounces it ''purr-zho''. I've no idea why.
     
  26. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    "Purr-zho" is apparently a common version in the UK (see #5) and I think it's fairly accurate, although the French vowel is short.
    However, in a rhotic accent like Irish, "purr" does not really sound like "peu" in French, in my opinion.
     
  27. Pedro y La Torre Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English (Ireland)
    You're right. It doesn't. I've tried correcting the pronunciation, with little success. :D
     

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