PGR

Insider

Senior Member
Ukraine (Ukrainian)
Hello everyone,

I have a problem with an understanding of this sentence:

Ostatni traktorzysta w PGR, bo traktor też ostatni, a nowych już nie będzie.

While translating this sentence into English it sounds as:

The last tractor driver in... because the tractor is the last, too, and the new already... *lost in translation*

Could anyone correct my translation or do it properly?

Thank you in advance
 
  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello everyone,

    I have a problem with an understanding of this sentence:

    Ostatni traktorzysta w PGR, bo traktor też ostatni, a nowych już nie będzie.

    While translating this sentence into English it sounds as:

    The last tractor driver in... because the tractor is the last, too, and the new already... *lost in translation*

    Could anyone correct my translation or do it properly?

    Thank you in advance
    Hi Insider, :)

    PGR is an abbrevation from Państwowe Gospodarstwo Rolne. It was a huge state-owned farm during the times when the Communist party ruled Poland.
    Here is something I found:
    [...] After the end of Second World War folwarks were nationalised (resulting in PGRs - state-owned folwarks, Polish Państwowe Gospodarstwo Rolne) or partitioned, usually with no or little compensation to their owners. [...]
    ]Source[/i]
    (This is) the last tractor driver in PGR as this is the last tractor too, and there won't be new ones.

    The whole sentence sounds a bit funny to me as if it were from one of Bareja's movies. :)
     

    Insider

    Senior Member
    Ukraine (Ukrainian)
    Hello Thomas,

    Well, I throught that it should be tha abbrevation, but couldn't find the meaning of its. What's regarding to the sentence, it was hard to understand this perhaps "word's play". :)

    This piece of the text hasn't been taken from Bareja's movie, but from Andrzej Stasiuk's book. :)

    Thank you for your help.

    Insider
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello Thomas,

    Well, I throught that it should be tha abbrevation, but couldn't find the meaning of its. What's regarding to the sentence, it was hard to understand this perhaps "word's play". :)
    To me it's more about assotiations with movies of the aforemetnioned film director. He satirized the world of Communist paradox in his films and the sentence in question sounds very similar. If you add to this some faces and voices of, familiar to the Polish, actors it brings smile upon your face. :)

    This piece of the text hasn't been taken from Bareja's movie, but from Andrzej Stasiuk's book. :)
    I never read him, but as far as I know he is considered quite a good writer nowadays in Poland.

    Tom
     
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