phallic renewal

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eb2520

New Member
Turkish
Hello,
I have seen this phrase in the Stone Mattress by Margaret Atwood:

"Verna,” he says. “That’s a lovely name.”
“Old-fashioned,” she says. “From the Latin word for ‘spring.’ When everything springs to life again.” That line, so filled with promises of phallic renewal, had been effective in helping to secure her second husband.

Is it a psychological term? What's the meaning of it in this context? I will be so glad if you explain or paraphrase it.

Thank you.

Source: http://www.newyorker.com/fiction/fe...?printable=true&currentPage=all#ixzz2NRWGXif9
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Verna's line about "everything springing to life" is intended to hold out a promise of sexual renewal for these elderly men she has her eye on.
     

    eb2520

    New Member
    Turkish
    So she says implicitly that they may further their acquaintances. Do I understand you correctly?
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    She says implicitly that her name is associated with "renewing" the life of all things - including penises that have become less responsive with age. She's promising these old men that she can help them get erections again.
     

    eb2520

    New Member
    Turkish
    Perhaps i could not express myself clearly, sorry. When Verna says "When everything springs to life again," does she imply sex?
     
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