Phrasal verbs meaning 'approach'

< Previous | Next >

MuiBo

Member
Vietnamese
In my text book, go up to, come up to and walk up to are all listed with the same meaning: "approach".
However in the exercises there is this sentence with only went up to & walked up to as correct answers:
She went up to / walked up to the door and rang the doorbell. :tick:
So I am wondering whether come up to is possible too and if it has any difference in meaning, such as in:

She came up to the door and rang the doorbell. :warning:
I am thankful as always and looking forward to your inputs. :thumbsup:
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You could say 'She came up to the door and rang the doorbell' if you were inside the house, or outside but standing by the door (which I guess is unlikely).

    You'd say the other two if you were outside the house.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I agree with post #2. Let me explain:

    In general "come" means "move towards the speaker". So you wouldn't say "She came up to the door." unless approaching the door moved her towards you
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top