Piccies

< Previous | Next >

Vickyhere

Senior Member
Italian
What does PICCIES mean?

And which word is it plural of?

I see that is used often (google) but I cannot relaize its meaning.

Thank you in advance
 
  • vox myopuli

    Senior Member
    English - American
    You mean Pisces, the astrological sign of the fish?
    It's similar to your native word for fish, although it is pronounced
    like English "Pie sees".
     

    anothersmith

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    It refers to photographs, which are sometimes called "pictures." "Picture" is sometimes abbreviated to "pic." The plural of "pic": "pics" or "piccies."
     

    Vickyhere

    Senior Member
    Italian
    YEEES... Is it right, it refers to photos... Clear!

    I could understand myself but I was thinging to something else...

    Thank you
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Anothersmith is correct. Note that while this may be a relatively well-known slang word for "pictures" on the Internet, it is not correct and it is, I'm sure, not used commonly outside the Internet. I would assume that it is only very rarely used by people in spoken conversations.
     

    Vickyhere

    Senior Member
    Italian
    To be honest I found it in office documents and in fact it refers to a series of pictures...

    May be it has been used by someone who uses internet slangs.

    Thank you again!
     

    vox myopuli

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Oh, pictures! You learn something new every day. It seems that English (and Australians?) construct a lot of words like this:
    bickies - biscuits
    telly - television

    "Piccies" is a new one for me.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Vickyhere said:
    NO!

    Piccies

    To be honest I found it in office documents and in fact it refers to a series of pictures...

    May be it has been used by someone who uses internet slangs.

    Thank you again!
    Vickyhere,

    When you have context.... provide context. This is a guideline of the forum. To have people guess and then say, "NO!" is neither in line with the guidelines of the forum nor is it polite. You are forcing them to guess by not providing context or background. It is no wonder that the answers are not correct.

    To quote from the Rules and Guidelines:


    Background



    Where did you see or hear the word or phrase?​
    … A book? … A newspaper? … A broadcast? … A conversation?
    What was the subject?
    When was it written?
    - Recently? – Or how long ago?

    If you are quoting text, remember WordReference Rule #16 and make sure you acknowledge the source.​

    Context
    Some context is essential.

    It is difficult to say how much context is required because it depends on the question. But no one has ever posted a question with too much context. The text coming immediately before and immediately after the word or phrase under discussion - the sentence containing the word or phrase - may be enough. Ideally, please quote two sentences before, and one sentence after (the maximum quoted text allowed by Rule #16).



    You can find the rest of this in the post marked READ ME FIRST at the top of the page.
     

    Vickyhere

    Senior Member
    Italian
    You are right and always I use to!

    This time, at the begging I did not know the contest because I was reading a planty of documentations and I did not know wich contest I could write regarding the new word... In fact I tried to find something on google and I discovered that the word it is very used even though the meaning still been not understandable.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I have a friend, a university professor and Oxford graduate, who always offers to show me the "piccies" from her holiday or asks what I'd like for a "prezie" (present) for my birthday. I find it so *very* strange, but it seems to be accepted in casual discourse.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I have a friend, a university professor and Oxford graduate, who always offers to show me the "piccies" from her holiday or asks what I'd like for a "prezie" (present) for my birthday. I find it so *very* strange, but it seems to be accepted in casual discourse.
    I've heard the word "prezies" several times; I've seen it spelled "prezzies." This underscores two points:
    1) These are not standard words.
    2) This process is not uncommon in BE. Another one I've heard a few times is "choccy" for chocolate.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Baby-talk in AE uses different mechanisms; it wouldn't surprise me to learn that some of these are less customary in BE.
    Oh, that's interesting - so AE doesn't, for example, say "doggie" for "dog" in baby-talk, or "horsey" for horse?
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Oh, that's interesting - so AE doesn't, for example, say "doggie" for "dog" in baby-talk, or "horsey" for horse?
    You picked two example where the short words are lengthened. There may be some examples where longer words are shortened and then suffixes such as "-ccie" are attached, but I don't think it's as common a practice in AE as it apparently is in BE.
     

    vox myopuli

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I can only think of a few examples in AE of this kind of shortening:

    Nighty for night gown.
    NAMES - e.g. Bloomie's for Bloomingdale's (although you won't catch me saying that).

    As bibliolept said, AE just adds the "ee" sound to fully formed short words.
    BE is more likely to abbreviate.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    A common AE slang term for pictures, especially in the press that's better used for fish wrap than reading, is pix.

    Bicycle=>bike, not bikie
    Tricycle=>tryke/trike, not trikie
    Politician=>pol, not polie or lying son-of-a-seahorse
    President=prexie (again, in the unreadable yellow press)
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Personally, I pluralize "pic" as "pics," an idiom that I'm sure is very widely recognized in AE, and I would not be surprised to hear that it has begun appearing in newspapers and magazines.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    A common AE slang term for pictures, especially in the press that's better used for fish wrap than reading, is pix.

    Bicycle=>bike, not bikie
    Tricycle=>tryke/trike, not trikie
    Politician=>pol, not polie or lying son-of-a-seahorse
    President=prexie (again, in the unreadable yellow press)
    To be fair, cuchu, I don't think you'd find "polie" in BrE either:D:D
    And "bikie/trikie" is unlikely to be used by consenting adults...
     

    tilywinn

    Senior Member
    Australia, English
    I agree with bibliolept that the plural for of pic is pics although I wouldn't find it odd to hear piccies either. That's the joy of AuE. ;)

    For me:
    Chocolate = choccy (one I often use)
    Present = Prezzie (I use it more often than present)
    Biscuit = Biccie (again, I use it more often than biscuit)
    Politician = Pollie
    Night gown = Nighty (I can't recall ever using night gown actually, even though it's the correct form)

    Note: In AuE we sometimes add an 'ie' sound (with a letter y or letters ey) to names to make a nick name. If not an 'ie' sound, an 'zza' or 'o'.
    eg. Mickey (Michael) , Hally (Hall), Matty (Matthew)
    Dazza (Darren), Azza (Aaron), Cazz/Cazza (Caroline) Bazza (Barry)
    Traino (Train Station), Servo (Service Station)
     

    vox myopuli

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Personally, I pluralize "pic" as "pics," an idiom that I'm sure is very widely recognized in AE, and I would not be surprised to hear that it has begun appearing in newspapers and magazines.
    I do, too.
    It's just like photos from photographs.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I should add, Vickyhere, that "piccies" is internet slang. I've never heard anyone actually say it out loud.
    The Oxford English Dictionary lists as synonyms for pic(tures)
    - pic (noun 4), earliest reference 1884
    - piccy, earliest reference 1865.
    - pix (noun 2), earliest reference 1925.
    You may not like these forms but you can't blame them on the internet.

    Maybe Americans are just less prone to using diminutives - after all everything is bigger over there!
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It is, of course, AusE which is the spiritual home of 'word+ie' (tinnie) and 'abbreviation+ie' (barbie).

    We need more input from tilywinn & compatriots:)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    What about naming a car Elizabeth, after the long form of a common name for a horse, Bessie. Step two: find a diminutive form that is short and ends in "ie".

    There you have the etymology of the popular nickname for the Ford Model T, the Tin Loobie Lizzie.

    Now let us all bow our heads in a moment of solemn thought, before we take piccies.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    What about naming a car Elizabeth, after a common long form of a name for a horse, Bessie. Step two: find a diminutive form that is short and ends in "ie".

    There you have the etymology of the popular nickname for the Ford Model T,
    the Tin Loobie Lizzie.
    Results 1 - 10 of about 43,800 for "Tin Lizzy".
    Results 1 - 10 of about 62,800 for "Tin Lizzie"

    I suppose you could look for Tin Lizzie piccies or Tin Lizzy pics. :D
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Oh, lummy, I've been missing this brill thread:(
    Thanks to Teddy [Teddy?] for pointing out that the singular of piccies is piccy rather than pic:thumbsup:

    I'd just like to add that this kind of thingie isn't exclusively baby-talk: not many parents talk to their babbies about wacky-baccy [marijuana].

    ~ewie [erm?]
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top