pick out onions?

jakartaman

Senior Member
Korean
Hi :)
Let's say someone who hates onions is trying to take all the onion pieces off his share of pizza topped with onion pieces among other things.
In that case, is it correct to say "He is picking out all the onions" or "He is picking all the onions out of his pizza"?
Thank you!
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I would tend to use "picking out" for selecting the items that I do want to eat. I wouldn't say "out of the pizza", because you are talking about taking something "off" the pizza and a pizza, being flat, doesn't have an "inside".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello jakartaman

    As veli suggests, and as you did in your first sentence, I'd use "off" rather than "out of".

    And I'd also say either "onion" or "pieces/slices/bits of onion"; "onions", to me, tends to imply whole onions.

    So... "He is picking off all the onion" or "He is picking all the onion off his pizza".
     

    jakartaman

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello jakartaman

    As veli suggests, and as you did in your first sentence, I'd use "off" rather than "out of".

    And I'd also say either "onion" or "pieces/slices/bits of onion"; "onions", to me, tends to imply whole onions.

    So... "He is picking off all the onion" or "He is picking all the onion off his pizza".

    Thank you, Loob
    Then when talking about a soup, I should say "He is picking out all the onion" or "He is picking all the onion out of his soup", shouldn't I?
    But veliarius doesn't recommend "picking" in this case...:confused:
    I would tend to use "picking out" for selecting the items that I do want to eat. I wouldn't say "out of the pizza", because you are talking about taking something "off" the pizza and a pizza, being flat, doesn't have an "inside".

    Thank you, velisarius. Then what should I use, "taking off" or "taking out" not "picking off" or "picking out"?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Staying with the pizza,

    "He is picking off all the onion" or "He is picking all the onion off his pizza".

    I could go with "picking the onion out of his soup", because I can't really imagine anyone picking bits of soggy onion out of the soup in order to eat them.

    If someone said "He picks all the onion slices out of the salad", I wouldn't know whether that was because he especially liked them or because he didn't like them at all.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    To be clear, you say "I am removing all the onions from my pizza."

    I might "pick up" small pieces. I might take the onions "out" of the pizza. I'm not sure I can combine "pick" with "out". There is a phrasal verb "pick out" with a different meaning ("choose;select") so I would probably avoid "pick"+"out".

    "Take off" is another phrasal verb. We "take off" clothing, and "put on" clothing.

    Before it is cooked, things are "on" the pizza. But after cooking, everything is stuck "in" the melted cheese.
     
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