picket [children school helpers]

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hasim4

Senior Member
indonesian
Hi native speakers,

We in Indonesia have a rolling group of student to keep the classroom clean from day to day. We call it 'piket' in Indonesian. The task of 'piket' students are to clean the floor, and to make verything available for the class. I wonder if you have such a group of student in charge of keeping our classroom in your country. If you have, what do you call it?

I search for the word 'picket' online, but the meaning is not the same as our Indoensian word 'piket.'

Hasim
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello, Hasim. :)

    I have never heard of students who do this kind of thing as a group.
    For the most part, schools are kept clean by adults. We called them 'janitors' where I went to school, but I wouldn't be surprised to find they have other titles in other parts of the world.
    This thread includes some discussion of school janitors, and other titles: janitor * custodian * caretaker?

    When I went to school, individual students who helped the teacher by doing smaller tasks were called 'monitors'. Other people had other names for them.
    See this discussion: Teacher's helper in a classroom
    :)
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    When I was at school, a pupil who carried out this type of classroom task (although not actually cleaning the floor) was called a "monitor".

    I'm not sure, though, whether this term is still in common BE use nowadays, nor whether it still means the same as it did then. :confused:

    [cross-posted with Cagey]
     

    cando

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I think it's a good idea, but sadly in the UK there is no equivalent. So the concept as well as the word would need explaining ("picket" is quite different). A "monitor" would be more about leadership in discipline than cleanliness, but I'm fairly sure that title and role is not widely used in state schools now, although Student Councils do exist.
     

    hasim4

    Senior Member
    indonesian
    Hello, Hasim. :)

    I have never heard of students who do this kind of thing as a group.
    For the most part, schools are kept clean by adults. We called them 'janitors' where I went to school, but I wouldn't be surprised to find they have other titles in other parts of the world.
    This thread includes some discussion of school janitors, and other titles: janitor * custodian * caretaker?

    When I went to school, individual students who helped the teacher by doing smaller tasks were called 'monitors'. Other people had other names for them.
    See this discussion: Teacher's helper in a classroom
    :)
    Thank very much you Cagey. I think 'monitor' is half what I mean in this context. 'Janitor' is a person who is in charge of keeping the classroom, and the whole school, clean, but 'piket' students is a group of students (usually 8 or 7 students) responsible to keep their classroom clean only, not the whole school. While 'teacher's helper' is a student alone (not a group of student) who helps a teacher doing his tasks. Both 'janitor' and 'teacher's helper' are not equal in meaning to what we mean by 'piket' in Indonesian. Thank you.
     
    Last edited:

    hasim4

    Senior Member
    indonesian
    When I was at school, a pupil who carried out this type of classroom task (although not actually cleaning the floor) was called a "monitor".

    I'm not sure, though, whether this term is still in common BE use nowadays, nor whether it still means the same as it did then. :confused:

    [cross-posted with Cagey]
    Thank very much you DonnyB. I think 'monitor' is almost close to mean what I mean in this context. Thank you.
     

    hasim4

    Senior Member
    indonesian
    I think it's a good idea, but sadly in the UK there is no equivalent. So the concept as well as the word would need explaining ("picket" is quite different). A "monitor" would be more about leadership in discipline than cleanliness, but I'm fairly sure that title and role is not widely used in state schools now, although Student Councils do exist.
    Thank you Cando. I think 'monitor' is the most appropriate word to mean what I mean in this context, but after I read your explanation that 'monitor' would be more about leadership than cleanliness, then I think there is no equal English word to mean 'piket' in Indonesian. But, anyway, Thank you for your expalanation.
     
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