pickle/chutney

orlando09

Senior Member
English (England)
Does anyone have any good suggestions for how to translate these? They are so typically British that perhaps it can't be done? There's nothing in the WR dictionary for chutney and for pickle it suggests "saumure", which I have looked up and is the briny liquid in which pickled fish (or other) is suspended, possibly with added herbs etc. I am thinking more of the Branston's Pickle type thing - the sort you'd eat with a Ploughman's Lunch etc or that you might eat with cold ham etc.
 
  • mignardise

    Senior Member
    US & Canada, English
    Ils sont en fait d'origine indienne... mais je connais pas l'équivalent en français.
    Le GDT suggère simplement "chutney".
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    chutney is an Indian word which is not translated into English. I think in French you would also use un chutney. If you wanted to describe it, how about sauce indienne aigre-douce ?
     

    orlando09

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    thanks for the suggestions - however I doubt that "pickle"is an indian word. I knew about "chutney", however it was borrowed into English a long time ago(like bungalow or juggernaut), and can be considered an English word as well as whatever its original language was. I think a "sauce indienne aigre-douce"would be too vague to get the idea across, but thanks for the suggestion. I suppose it's just un chutney/un pickle then - whether or not anyone understands!

    PS I'm not sure myself what the difference between the 2 is , if any. Perhaps a chutney is a bit sweeter/fruitier. As far as I know there is nothing very similar in typical French cooking?
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    thanks for the suggestions - however I doubt that "pickle"is an indian word. I knew about "chutney", however it was borrowed into English a long time ago(like bungalow or juggernaut), and can be considered an English word as well as whatever its original language was. I think a "sauce indienne aigre-douce"would be too vague to get the idea across, but thanks for the suggestion. I suppose it's just un chutney/un pickle then - whether or not anyone understands!

    PS I'm not sure myself what the difference between the 2 is , if any. Perhaps a chutney is a bit sweeter/fruitier. As far as I know there is nothing very similar in typical French cooking?
    chutney is a kind of pickled dish that includes Indian curry spices--it's unique and in French it's un chutney, borrowed from the Indian just like in English. It is pickled, but then sugar is added--the two ingredients aren't necessary for pickling though--just the sour part (salt and vinegar).

    other pickled dishes could be pickallily, pickles, pickled eggs, kimchee, etc.

    all of them can be described in French as en saumure. Some have specific names but you would have to ask for a specific translation then.
     

    zanzi

    Senior Member
    French from France
    I think every one agree that Chutney remains chutney !! or "une purée de fruits douce- amère " ? salée sucrée ? une sorte de confiture salée ?


    But I wouldn't use "en saumure" it sounds very strange.

    cela m'échappe là tout de suite, mais comment dit - on pour les petits oignons blancs en bocaux et pour les olives, les cornichons etc ???!!!
    Ce sont des oignons .... ??? aarrghh zut :confused: !!

    Anyway, I am positive there IS something but I am sorry my mind is playing tricks on me tonight !!
     

    orlando09

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    for "pickle" do you not mean "cornichon"??
    or is what you're talking about not made from a cucumber...
    no, although I agree that can also be a "pickle", but in the UK, we'd usually call it a gherkin (pickled gherkin if you like - ie in brine [en saumure?] - like pickled eggs/pickled onions etc -typical British fish and chip shop extras).

    A "pickle" can also sometimes be something pretty indistinguishable from a chutney, it just depends on what the manufacturer calls it I think, although, as I say, I have a feeling chutneys tend to be a bit sweeeter/fruitier, whereas pickles are perhaps more vegetable-based. They are both a rich concoction of finely chopped up fruit/veg bits in a thick sweet/sour sauce, bought in a jar. You would eat them with salad/cheese/cold meats etc.
     

    JeanDeSponde

    Senior Member
    France, Français
    I'm not specialized in cooking and recipes, but I've always heard chutney referred to as "chutney" (noun + qual.) in French, for lack of some corresponding word, and pickle / pickled as "au vinaigre" or "en condiment" (if not, as for ginger, simply as "gingembre en pickle").
    Cornichons au vinaigre, câpres au vinaigre...
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top