Picturesque idiom meaning "He wants to have it all"

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chatterbox0610

Member
français -Paris
Hello everybody,

I was asked to give the English equivalent of a French idiom, and was stuck : This idiom says , "He wants the butter, the money from the sale of the butter (and now, most people add ...) and the farmer's wife too ...", meaning " he wants to have all the advantages, including the unthinkable ones ..."
One of my American friends had already suggested "He wants to have it all!", but she had acknowledged that it "lost much in the translation" ...We'd like, if possible to keep the image (or an image ...) of the French expression ...

Could anyeone, please, help us ? We'll be grateful for any suggestion. Thank you very much.
Chatterbox
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    All that comes immediately to mind is "lock, stock, and barrel"—but I don't think that quite reflects the sort of situation you have in mind.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "What do you want, egg in your beer?"

    (I have no idea why putting egg in one's beer is supposed to suggest an excess of goodness. I'll take my beer with no egg, thank you.)
     

    chatterbox0610

    Member
    français -Paris
    "What do you want, egg in your beer?"

    (I have no idea why putting egg in one's beer is supposed to suggest an excess of goodness. I'll take my beer with no egg, thank you.)
    Thank you for your suggestion ... I don't like beer, and adding egg to it sounds all the more terrible .... ;0)) I'll let you have plain beer, but will try to find the origin of this idiom that I had never heard either ... ;0)
     

    chatterbox0610

    Member
    français -Paris
    Hi everyone !
    It's a surprise for me, the "rookie", "junior member"to see that there are so many answers and suggestions for one little question ! :) Thanks very much ... I think the "cake", which, as you say, is common in the UK will do, just now ...
    Yet, I'm not totally satisfied to lose the image. Besides, this idiom must be used at a meeting of "friendly businessmen" in the US. Consequently, I'd prefer something more "American" ... Am I too hard to please ?
    I also posted on the French-English forum and got the "cake" too ... :) Thanks to all of you for your help !
     
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