Pieces of Furniture

cuchuflete

Senior Member
EEUU-inglés
VenusEnvy said:
Ahhh, thanks for that. :thumbsup:


Niña: Can you try to keep it in alphabetical order? Thanks for adding English words. But, I don't even know what worktop and brazier table are. Can you add the definitions?

P.S. Cuchu: Should we even be keeping them in alphabetical order? . . .

Hola Venus,
I would do the alphabetical sort once in a while, as a convenience for the reader, but it's not necessary to do it for every entry. Leaving the added entries at the bottom makes them more visible.
Would you like me to turn on "track changes" in this file? That too may help highlight new entries, and allow you to see if any er..ummm....inappropriate (!) edits have been done.

Question: since when are appliances...washers, dryers, etc. considered furniture? I drop my keys and mail on the micro ondas, as well as the kitchen table, but that's about all they have in common as furniture.:)
 
  • VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    cuchuflete said:
    Question: since when are appliances...washers, dryers, etc. considered furniture? I drop my keys and mail on the micro ondas, as well as the kitchen table, but that's about all they have in common as furniture.:)
    Hmm... So then, what does furniture make?

    I considered washer/dryers furniture because:
    It is a large piece of a room
    Without it, for example, a washer/dryer room would be nothing
    They may be taken with one when one moves
    Some are chosen for style, according to preference

    I really don't know whata made me consider it furniture. Perhaps it's the way the people I know use them in their homes. ???
     

    Terry Mount

    Senior Member
    U S A
    How about naming the list furniture and household appliances...at least for it's English name.

    "crib" a bed for an infant I suppose is the same as "baby bed or babybed".... At any rate I believe baby bed is more current in US English.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I like Terry Mount's solution: change the glossary name to fit the list.:)

    Here is what our own dict. says:
    Adapted From: WordNet 2.0 Copyright 2003 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

    furniture Anoun
    1 furniture, piece_of_furniture, article_of_furniture

    furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy;
    which is of little use unless you define...
    1 furnishings

    the instrumentalities (furniture and appliances and other movable accessories including curtains and rugs) that make a home (or other area) livable

    Which seems to imply that movable appliances like lamps are included. I'm not sure that I would include a vacuum cleaner or a dryer;)
     

    Phryne

    Senior Member
    Argieland--Esp/Eng
    Hola gente!

    1. Words I added:
    "biblioteca" for bookcase, "araña" for chandelier, "placard" for closet, "sillón" for armchair, "cama cucheta" for bunk bed, "cuna" for cradle (please tell me if you agree on this one), "sofá cama" for futon (again, tell me if you agree) and for sofa bed (we don't have a distinction for futon and sofa bed, I think), "estantes" for shelves.

    2. Opinions
    I want to hear opinions on those words I inserted, since I feel some might be not shared by most people (like araña), and a couple of them I wonder if you call them differently, such as sofa-bed and futon, which I both call sofá cama.

    3. Words repeated:
    At the end, there are a few words that are already in the list, such as writing desk (isn't this a desk?), four-poster bed, bunk bed and area rug.

    4. I added a couple of definitions:
    futon, sofa-bed

    5. Some words don't have definitions:
    worktop, writing desk, reading lamp, brazier lamp.

    6. Shouldn't shelves be singular? In that case “estantes” should be changed to “estante”.

    Saludos :)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Phryne said:
    3. Words repeated:
    At the end, there are a few words that are already in the list, such as writing desk (isn't this a desk?), four-poster bed, bunk bed and area rug.
    Yes, Cuchu added them as alternative definitions. I think the next person that puts the list in alphabetical order, they should line up correctly.
    cuchuflete said:
    Added some alternate EN definitions at bottom of EN list.

    Phryne said:
    5. Some words don't have definitions:
    worktop, writing desk, reading lamp, brazier lamp.
    Yes, a couple are from niña. I'd like to know what they are, too. I'd like it, too, if those who added words also defined them . . .
     

    niña

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Added definitions and Spanish translations


    Oops! Sorry, I can't upload the file. It seems I exceeded my quota by 26.5 KB @_@

    You are currently using 171.8 KB to store 8 uploaded attachments.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Whodunit said:
    Updated the German version ... The problem is that the file is already 80 KB. It started with less than 20 KB. :eek:

    Try deleting earlier versions, and within the current file, delete cells to the right of, and below, the area with entries.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    In the Spanish column, wine rack is translated three different ways:
    vinera
    botellera
    botellero

    What's the difference between the last two? (There are also several Spanish nouns missing genders...)
     

    niña

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Venus, I think Whodunit didn't see my post and updated the German column in an older file :(

    In the Spanish column, wine rack is translated three different ways:
    vinera
    botellera
    botellero

    The are no difference between the last two words. Either of them can be used to define the same thing. I'm more familiar with "botellero" though.
    As for "vinera", I've never heard that word before. I looked it up in the dictionary just in case, but it doesn't appear.
     

    OlivierG

    Senior Member
    France / Français
    In this file, the "track changes" option has been turned on, which makes the file inflating significantly. With a 200KB limit per user on uploaded files, we'll quickly reach the bounds. :(
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Alphabetized list
    Merged niña and Who's entries
    Removed duplicate entries
    Took into account multiple/varied English definitions
    Re-formatted

    Done! :tick:
     

    niña

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    I added again my SP traslations for "futon", "shelves" and "reading lamp" which got missed on the way. I also added the Sp translation for "radiator"
     

    Attachments

    • Furniture and Household Appliance Glossary 21.xls
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    OlivierG

    Senior Member
    France / Français
    Added some translations in French.

    Question: What is a brazier table? :confused:
     

    Attachments

    • Furniture and Household Appliance Glossary 23.xls
      33 KB · Views: 72

    Sev

    Senior Member
    France, french.
    Olivier, for "coat rack" you've written "penderie". The definition given in english is "a tall piece of furniture that is meant to hold coats, jackets, and hats", so I guess it's more "un porte-manteau", which is different (penderie is inside a closet). :)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Sev said:
    Olivier, for "coat rack" you've written "penderie". The definition given in english is "a tall piece of furniture that is meant to hold coats, jackets, and hats", so I guess it's more "un porte-manteau" :tick: , which is different (penderie is inside a closet). :)

    I agree, Sev. "Une penderie" would a "wardrobe" or "closet", I think.
     

    OlivierG

    Senior Member
    France / Français
    Sev said:
    Olivier, for "coat rack" you've written "penderie". The definition given in english is "a tall piece of furniture that is meant to hold coats, jackets, and hats", so I guess it's more "un porte-manteau", which is different (penderie is inside a closet). :)

    Thanks, but I didn't add this translation. It has been made by Agnes, in post #48 (version 13). It's up to her to amend this line.
     

    Sev

    Senior Member
    France, french.
    OlivierG said:
    Thanks, but I didn't add this translation. It has been made by Agnes, in post #48 (version 13). It's up to her to amend this line.
    Oops sorry I didn't look close enough, I thought you were the only froggy who added french words...
     

    Anna Più

    Senior Member
    Catalonia, Catalan
    I have added the Catalan Column!
     

    Attachments

    • Furniture & Household Appliances Glossary 24.xls
      44.5 KB · Views: 135

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Anna Più said:
    I have added the Catalan Column!
    Thanks, Anna! I see that some of your translations include more than one word. Take a look at how the others worked this out. A new word goes on a new line. Also, remember to put the gender in the gender column.

    Thanks for sharing your entries! :p
     

    Anna Più

    Senior Member
    Catalonia, Catalan
    Hy VenusEnvy,
    That's ok. I have added the changes you make me notice. uppss...
     

    Attachments

    • Furniture & Household Appliances Glossary 26.xls
      45.5 KB · Views: 111

    Helicopta

    Senior Member
    England - English (Learning Spanish)
    I’m not sure how best to integrate them (I’ll leave that up to Venus) but here are a few BE variations:

    AE: area rug BE: rug (anything wall to wall in BE is a carpet)
    AE: armoire BE: wardrobe
    AE: coat rack BE: hat stand
    AE: crib BE: cot
    AE: dryer BE: dryer/tumble dryer
    AE: floor lamp BE: standard lamp
    AE: sofa/couch BE: sofa/couch/settee
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Helicopta said:
    AE: area rug BE: rug (anything wall to wall in BE is a carpet)
    Actually, we use carpet too...
    Is area rug different? I thought area rug was just a really large rug that covered a large area, whereas carpet is wall-to-wall...
     

    Helicopta

    Senior Member
    England - English (Learning Spanish)
    In the spreadsheet the definitions appear as follows:

    area rug = a piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a room.
    rug = wall-to-wall floor covering.

    In BE we wouldn't use 'area rug', we would just call it a rug. If it's 'wall-to-wall' then it's definitely not a rug, it's a carpet!
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Helicopta said:
    In the spreadsheet the definitions appear as follows:

    area rug = a piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a room.
    rug = wall-to-wall floor covering.
    Well, then, having pointed this out, it seems as though the definitions should be switched, no?

    Let me see...

    Area rug: a large piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes
    Rug: a piece of women fabric used for decorative purposes (of various sizes)

    Carpet: woven fabric that covers the floor entirely; wall-to-wall carpet
    Wall-to-wall carpet: woven fabric that covers the floor entirely, wall-to-wall

    So, what say you? . . . .
     

    Soulcruz

    Senior Member
    Español - Argentina
    By the way, If I'm not wrong, in Spain I've never heard calling "mesita de luz" to the "night stand" but rather"mesita de noche" and the same thing with refrigerator (frigorífico) and "cushion" (cojín). I wondered where those varations are from :)[/QUOTE]

    Hi there! i´m living in Argentina and we use "mesita de luz" instead of "mesa de noche". To talk about the fridge we use "heladera" (frigorifico, for us, means a factory in which they preserve the meat freezed)
    Cushion is "almohadon"...
    So as you see, in LatinAmerica there is a lot of ways to say the same...

    Kisees.Lorena
     

    winnie

    Senior Member
    italy, italian
    Italian updating
     

    Attachments

    • furniture & household appliances glossary 28.xls
      46.5 KB · Views: 440

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    area rug n a piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a room

    In (american) english, that is a tapestry, not an area rug.



    Area rug and a carpet have the same meaning in AE and BE.
    Area rug = rug = partial floor covering.
    carpet = complete floor covering.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    nycphotography said:
    area rug n a piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a room

    In (american) english, that is a tapestry, not an area rug.

    When you say tapestry, what do you mean? As far as I know, a tapestry is a "rug" that is hung on a wall. Whereas, an area rug goes on the floor.

    Even a rug on the floor is a "piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a room", no?
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    VenusEnvy said:
    When you say tapestry, what do you mean? As far as I know, a tapestry is a "rug" that is hung on a wall. Whereas, an area rug goes on the floor.

    Even a rug on the floor is a "piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a room", no?

    yes, but as used in the glossary,

    area rugna piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a roomarea rugndecorative woven fabric floor covering

    They are redundant. The second one, on the floor, is a clearly rug. Leading to the implication, that since the first one must be different, and the only apparent difference is the ommission of "floor covering", that it must be a tapestry, and should probably be also be clearly specified as a "wall hanging".

    Plus, some of the translations looked suspiciously similar to tapestry ;-)
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    nycphotography said:
    area rug
    a piece of woven fabric used for decorative purposes to accent a room

    area rug
    decorative woven fabric floor covering

    They are redundant. The second one, on the floor, is a clearly rug. Leading to the implication, that since the first one must be different, and the only apparent difference is the ommission of "floor covering", that it must be a tapestry, and should probably be also be clearly specified as a "wall hanging".
    Ahhh, I see...
    This could be that one person defined area rug one way, and another person simply chose to define it another. That is, two different people gave two different definitions. And, as one can only edit their OWN contributions, both remained.

    But, I totally understand what you're saying.
    nyc said:
    Plus, some of the translations looked suspiciously similar to tapestry ;-)
    They did?.....Hmmm...

    Well, it would help us if someone who translated "area rug" specified what THEY thought when they translated... Hmm...
     
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