pin pushpin [thumbtack] map sewing paper pins

< Previous | Next >

stephenlearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

When you refer to a pin, do you generally refer to a pushpin [thumbtack]?
Pin could refer to several different things, according to dictionaries, so I wonder what you mean if you talk about pin.

Thanks.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    As the name suggests, people use them to pin papers together.
    I'd actually call those sewing-pins if I had to add a descriptor to them. I use for them pinning pieces of fabric together to stop them moving around while being sewn.
    e.g.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    How can you tell they are huge? You can tell they are pins and not nails by the lack of tooling marks below the head. They aren't normally used to pin papers together in the UK, so they aren't called "paper pins" here, but are used by dressmakers and tailors.

    PS I see ewie beat me to it.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    In American English, I believe we call "paper pins" or "sewing pins" "straight pins."
    straightpin2.jpg
    straightpin1.jpg



    Push pins:
    pushpin.jpg
    pushpin2.png



    Thumbtacks:
    thumbtack.jpg
     
    Last edited:

    stephenlearner

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I have found a picture about nails from Wikipedia.

    Spijkers_(Nails).jpg


    Nails 3, 4, and 5 look very much like the straight pins or sewing pins you mentioned. The difference is the thickness of the body. I can't see any other differences.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I see the pins in #3 and in #9 are different. The ones in #9, with the round heads, are usually used with fabric. The ones in #3 are like the ones in the images in my post #2, with metal flat-topped heads (or perhaps slightly convex) and are, at least over here, used with paper.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The ones in #9, with the round heads, are usually used with fabric.
    That's just because ewie's luxurious sewing-pins happen to have plastic heads. My sewing-pins are more spartan and have plain metal heads.
    I would not normally use such long straight pins with paper, certainly not to pin papers together (I'd use staples or paper clips). I might use them for affixing papers to a cork-board, but only if I didn't have drawing-pins (BE for AE thumb tacks) or push-pins available, and then I would prefer plastic-headed ones because they hurt my fingers less when I push them in.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Perhaps it's just an issue of custom then. Flat (or flattish) and metal headed pins, especially with small heads, are usually used with paper here. I suppose they could be used with fabric too.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Nails 3, 4, and 5 look very much like the straight pins or sewing pins you mentioned. The difference is the thickness of the body. I can't see any other differences.
    The size in general is very different. The straight pins are very smooth and shiny. The tip of the straight pin is much sharper, more gradually pointed, and completely round. The tips of the nails are blunter and often have a square shape (3 even has indentations at the tip). You can easily prick your finger and draw blood with a straight pin. It would take a lot of effort to break the skin with most nails.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In American English, I believe we call "paper pins" or "sewing pins" "straight pins."
    View attachment 25108 View attachment 25109


    Push pins:
    View attachment 25106 View attachment 25105


    Thumbtacks:
    View attachment 25107
    You saved me the effort of looking for those very images. Push pins are used for frequently changed items on a bulletin board. They are easily grasped. Thumb tacks are easily removed too, but not quite as easily.

    And sometimes called "map tacks" or "push pin map tacks" are pins with color coded balls on the top to indicate different properties at different locales. These pins generally have a shorter shaft than regular sewing pins, but not as short as thumb tacks.

     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Perhaps it's just an issue of custom then. Flat (or flattish) and metal headed pins, especially with small heads, are usually used with paper here.
    Would you mind clarifying what you mean by "used with paper"? Is it to attach individual sheets of paper to something like a bulletin board, or to attach, say, several pages of a multi-page document together? In the latter case, I can't see this working well with more than three sheets.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Would you mind clarifying what you mean by "used with paper"? Is it to attach individual sheets of paper to something like a bulletin board, or to attach, say, several pages of a multi-page document together? In the latter case, I can't see this working well with more than three sheets.
    Some bulletin boards lack moderators, and the results can get out of hand. Probably more than three sheets to the wind pin.:D

     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    or to attach, say, several pages of a multi-page document together?
    This one. Yes, usually it's only a few pages. Quite a common sight in Indian offices, especially government ones - a few sheets attached with a pin in the upper left-hand corner.

    As I said, I suppose those same pins might be used by tailors too. I don't have much experience of that.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    a few sheets attached with a pin in the upper left-hand corner
    I see. Isn't there a risk of injury from the sharp points of the pins when rifling through piles of such papers?
    While I can understand a reluctance to embrace new technology, staplers are really pretty good and have been around for a long time. I use them all the time.
    Stapler - Wikipedia
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Isn't there a risk of injury from the sharp points of the pins when rifling through piles of such papers?
    You can reduce the risk by doing it right and making sure the pinpoint doesn't extend beyond the edge of the papers. There's an art to it.:cool:

    While I can understand a reluctance to embrace new technology, staplers are really pretty good and have been around for a long time. I use them all the time.
    I think I've seen those things on occasion. A few people here know how to use them, and more are getting trained every day. But some people are set in their ways, and force of habit plays a big role here. Government offices that have been ordering boxes of pins in bulk from suppliers for years find it difficult to make significant transitions fast.

    I don't know if you've heard the story, but apparently, before WW II, Churchill started smoking cigars made by a south Indian company. The government authority that handled the shipping to England continued with the paperwork for this till well after the war and after independence, though the actual shipping stopped, writing "Zero" in the box for quantity.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The Indian Civil Service picked up its habits from the British Civil Service, and Indian banks from British banks. I can remember old documents pinned together - but always sufficiently long ago that the pins had rusted. Staplers with a rotating plate to give a choice of stapling or pinning are a relatively modern invention (ie, post the end of the Raj, and probably after I was born). It is possible that the "we've always done it this way" approach remains active in Indian bureaucracy. It's common enough in other countries. ;)

    Cross-posted with Barque, who seems to agree.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top