pip / seed

< Previous | Next >
  • Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    If you are talking just about the seeds found within fruit, then, yes, there is a correlation to size, but seed is not always the correct term. Like JulianStuart I have only heard "pip" from Brits, but even here "seed" is more common (perhaps "pip" is more common with apples, in other fruits "seed" is more prevalent). BUT for very large seeds, like those in plums or peaches, then "stone" is the word used by the general public, not seed.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    We (AE) tend to call the stone in a peach a "pit". So a peach pit is something you wouldn't eat. I'm uncertain if a plum stone is called a pit, as well, but I'm guessing it probably is. Stone is not wrong, but I think it is a more generic term. Olives with the stones removed are called pitted olives.

    There was a diner in the TV series Beverly Hills, 90210 called the Peach Pit (not the Peach Stone). :)
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    We (AE) tend to call the stone in a peach a "pit". So a peach pit is something you wouldn't eat. I'm uncertain if a plum stone is called a pit, as well, but I'm guessing it probably is. Stone is not wrong, but I think it is a more generic term. Olives with the stones removed are called pitted olives.

    There was a diner in the TV series Beverly Hills, 90210 called the Peach Pit (not the Peach Stone). :)
    Sorry for not making myself clear enough - the seed in peaches and plums etc. is called the "stone" (or, infrequently, kernel) in BrE. I know that "pit" is the AE term, but that's never used in BrE.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    On the contrary. A cherry stone is commonly called a "cherry pit" and the supermarket shelves bear rows of jars and tins of "pitted olives".
    Yes, pitted olives for sure, you are correct. But I honestly don't think I've ever heard a Brit say "cherry pits" - that is entirely a US term to me. (Though the number of conversations that I've had regarding cherry stones at all is minimal :p)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    jars and tins of "pitted olives".
    Only because "stoned olives" sounds amusing, like "soused mackerel".

    For me it's always cherry stones and olive stones. "Pits" are what you dig to plant them in.

    I've a feeling this may be a British class thing. "Cherry pits" may be more upper - or perhaps it's regional.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top