1. Rivendell

    Rivendell Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish / Spain
    Hi all,

    can you help me with the right word (pip or seed) for the different fruits below?

    grape pips?
    orange/lemon pips?
    watermelon seeds?
    melon seeds?
    pumpkin seeds?
    apricot pip?
    peach pip?
    cherry pip?
    apple seeds?
    pear seeds?

    And also, olive pit?

    Thanks.
     
  2. grubble

    grubble Senior Member

    South of England, UK
    British English
    British English

    cherry, peach, nectarine, plum - stone

    olive - pit or stone

    apple, pear - seeds or pips


    Are these the same in the USA?
     
  3. Rivendell

    Rivendell Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish / Spain
    Thanks for your quick answer, grubble. So, could we say that seeds are the small flat ones, pips are the small round ones and stones are the big ones?
     
  4. grubble

    grubble Senior Member

    South of England, UK
    British English
    I think that is a good approximation. However I am not sure the distinction is entirely logical (or even consistent) between individual native speakers!.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011
  5. Rivendell

    Rivendell Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish / Spain
    Thanks again, grubble. Any comments from USA speakers?
     
  6. rosen4 New Member

    English - American
    In the USA we don't usually use "stone" -- where you have stone, we'd use "pit." Also, I never, ever hear "pip" used for anything except (a) the little black dots on dice (and this is a sort of antiquated usage) and (b) the back up singers for Gladys Night (The Pips). So in the USA:

    cherry, peach, nectarine, plum - pit

    olive - pit

    apple, pear - seeds

    David R.
     
  7. Rivendell

    Rivendell Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish / Spain
    Thanks for your help, folks.
     
  8. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    In AmEng grapes, lemons and oranges have seeds, not pips, apricots, peaches, cherries and plums have pits.
    All the seeds in your original list are indeed called seeds in Am Eng.
     
  9. Rivendell

    Rivendell Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish / Spain
    Thank you, Aztlaniano: seeds & pits for the USA!!
     
  10. Spug Senior Member

    Perhaps it's due to my age or the region of the US that I'm from, but I heard the word pip frequently when I was growing up. It referred to any small seed, such as those from apples, oragnes, and grapes.
     

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