piss-take

tonytahiri

New Member
Albania, Albanian
hi m8s,
there is a word pis... me off cause I can't find it and that's piss-take
Please help me m8s!
 
  • Aupick

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Piss-take is a noun constructed from the more common expression 'to take the piss (out of someone)', which also appears in a less vulgar form as 'to take the mickey'.

    It basically means to mock, to make fun of, laugh at someone.
     

    Helicopta

    Senior Member
    England - English (Learning Spanish)
    Aupick is right.

    I would add that I think it’s primarily a British English expression (and it’s something of a tradition here). Taking the piss is usually done in the spirit of fun but can occasionally become mean or spiteful. If someone says or does anything that their friends could find amusing, their friends will usually ‘take the piss out of them’ by teasing them and making jokes at their expense.

    You might ask someone “Are you taking the piss?” if you're not sure if they're being serious or not. If you think someone is trying to take advantage of you (perhaps by charging you too much money for something) you might say “You’re taking the piss aren’t you?” or “This is a complete piss-take!”.

    Also, something that is satirical or a pastiche could be described as a piss-take of something else, for example the Austin Powers films could be said to be a piss-take of the James Bond films.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    So a piss-take could be a satire?

    Here across the pond and overland to the next pond I've never heard of piss-take!
    Piss someone off, take a piss, yes--piss-take, no!
    Live and learn something new every day!
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Aupick said:
    Piss-take is a noun constructed from the more common expression 'to take the piss (out of someone)', which also appears in a less vulgar form as 'to take the mickey'.
    And occasionally you might hear "to extract the michael", although this version doesn't necessarily reflect a person's level of education. In fact, you might say that it's simply taking the mickey out of "taking the mickey".
     

    mzsweeett

    Senior Member
    USA
    USA, American English
    Along this line here.... what then is pissing the night away? A student from England said it before....we all just nodded and had no idea of what was meant...needless to say this was waaaaaaaay before I came to WR. :eek: Or should I pose this as a new thread?

    Sweet T.
     

    desde aquel verano

    Senior Member
    UK / English
    Hi Sweet T,
    I'd say that "pissing the night away" is just a slightly more vulgar way of saying "drinking the night away"... pissing (urinating) being an unavoidable consequence of this particular activity. :eek:
    In England we also say "to go on the piss", which is like going out and getting "well bevvied up" (slang phrase for drinking lots of beer :D).
    Ciao
     

    desde aquel verano

    Senior Member
    UK / English
    PS. In the UK: "to be pissed" = "to be drunk". Maybe someone should try to compile a list of all the different phrases/idioms with "piss", it's such a multi-purpose word, lol.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    American usage for "pissing the night away" [or one's time in general] is different: it means to waste one's time, not necessarily in drinking.

    He pissed away an entire hour playing computer games instead of working.

    And "pissed off" means angry. His boss was really pissed off about it.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Kelly B said:
    American usage for "pissing the night away" [or one's time in general] is different: it means to waste one's time, not necessarily in drinking.

    He pissed away an entire hour playing computer games instead of working.

    And "pissed off" means angry. His boss was really pissed off about it.
    .... as it does in BE, Kelly,

    In general I've found that in AE "pissed" = "pissed off" = angry
    Whereas in BE "pissed" = drunk, and "pissed off" = angry

    Maybe you knew that. :)

    W :):)
     

    daviesri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Helicopta said:
    I would add that I think it’s primarily a British English expression (and it’s something of a tradition here).

    You might ask someone “Are you taking the piss?” if you're not sure if they're being serious or not. If you think someone is trying to take advantage of you (perhaps by charging you too much money for something) you might say “You’re taking the piss aren’t you?” .

    This is truly a British English term. The only place you would hear the above expressions in the US would be in a drug testing lab or a doctors office.
     
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