pitch something at somebody

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
I came across the following sentence on Macmillan Dictionary, but I am not sure if it makes sense. Here it is: "Her book is pitched at a teenage audience." I also came across "He had tried to pitch the series to all the major television networks." - meaning "to sell them." Do they make sense to you, or they are considered odd and unacceptable?


Thank you
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Her book is pitched at a teenage audience." I also came across "He had tried to pitch the series to all the major television networks.
    These are normal uses of "pitch" with a figurative meaning, Gandalf. I don't think I hear "pitch" used this way as much as I used to, but it still exists.

    I'd use "to a teenage audience" rather than "at a teenage audience" in the first example.
     
    Last edited:

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    I agree with owlman5 - perfectly standard uses of "pitch". Pitch meaning to sell is very widely used in business, and especially in the TV and movie industries.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Pitch" basically means to attempt to sell rather than to sell. It's widely used by writers who are suggesting (attempting to sell) ideas for TV shows or films to networks or producers (as in one of the sentences you quoted) or ideas for books or articles to publishers.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    These are normal uses of "pitch" with a figurative meaning, Gandalf. I don't think I hear "pitch" used this way as much as I used to, but it still exists.

    I'd use "to a teenage audience" rather than "at a teenage audience" in the first example.
    Whereas I'd use "at" in that specific context. I think it's a slightly different meaning of 'to pitch'. 'Pitch to' - present or propose something to somebody in order to make a sale. 'Pitch at' - produce in a way to appeal to a particular audience. That second meaning is, I think, from these meanings of 'to pitch' given in the OED
    To fix the relative place, position, level, etc., of something.
    To set at a particular rate or level (as high, low, etc.). Later also more generally: to express in a particular style or manner
     

    trèsbébête

    New Member
    English - USA
    Specifically in the television industry, people pitch (or propose) series ideas to networks. Pitch can also be a noun; for example, 'Everyone at CBS liked her pitch.' TV writers, in particular, also use the word pitch to mean, in the context of everyday work, 'suggest an idea.' On sitcoms, writers spend most of their time pitching jokes.
     
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