pizza shop vs. pizzeria

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jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
In AmE, I often heard "pizza shop" instead of "pizzeria". What is the difference between them? If no, which one is more common in colloquial AmE? Thank you.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I'm sure I always say "pizza place" and have never used either "pizzeria" (except when in Italy) or "pizza shop."
     

    ewhite

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    When talking about your local neighborhood spot, pizzeria, or pizza place, would be used in New York City, Outlets of the big chains would probably be referred to by the company name--Pizza Hut, for example, or Domino's. I've never heard pizza shop.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    When talking about your local neighborhood spot, pizzeria, or pizza place, would be used in New York City, Outlets of the big chains would probably be referred to by the company name--Pizza Hut, for example, or Domino's. I've never heard pizza shop.
    I would agree with the above, although I would add that for those of us New Yorkers who are of a certain age, "pizza parlor" would be more automatic than "pizza place" as an alternative to the common term "pizzeria."
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Unless it serves pizza and nothing else, it's an Italian restaurant or Italian place.

    If it only sells pizza, a pizzeria or pizza place. I don't think I have heard "shop".
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In the U.S., usage of different terms for places that sell (mostly) pizza is regional. In Massachusetts "pizza shop" is common, though you'll hear the other terms as well. For that matter, even the word "pizza" is regional. In parts of Connecticut, for example, it's called "apizza." (See this photo and this one, for example.) I have no idea why.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Egmont, is it really called "apizza" by Connecticut natives? Or is it just on signs?

    On the two signs, it looks like a bit of humor - a fake stereotype Italian-American accent, created by adding "a" to everything. For example, "I make-a you one a-big a-pizza, she so beautiful, you a-gonna see!". For more examples, see Marx Brothers.

    The Zuppardi's sign says it was founded in 1954. In 1954 it was common to joke like that. Most of our jokes were about Polish or Irish immigrants (I am Polish/Irish and I thought they were funny), but Italian jokes were around too.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Egmont, is it really called "apizza" by Connecticut natives? Or is it just on signs? ...
    Yes, they really call it that. It is absolutely NOT a fake Italian accent or an attempt at humor. (I doubt you could get all the Italian pizza shop owners in a city to go along with either of those.) It really is what the locals call pizza.

    I've spent a lot of time in Connecticut. I've heard a story that apizza isn't quite the same as pizza - that it's the Neapolitan version (or something like that, I'm too lazy to look it up right now, but I'm sure our good friend Google can find it). That may have been true at some point in the past, but the majority of New Haven pizzerias/pizza shops/pizza parlors/pizza places/etc. now serve pies that are indistinguishable from those served anywhere else in the U.S. (New Haven, in south-central Connecticut, seems to be the center of the "apizza" world. It is also known as the home of Yale University and the furthest point in that direction that you can reach on New York City commuter trains, which are much less expensive than Amtrak's intercity trains.)
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    It's usually 'pizza place' or 'pizza joint' in Australia.

    David and I are going to that pizza joint in Annandale for a bite to eat tonight. Do you want to join us?

    There's a new pizza place that opened up in Newtown last week. I'm going there for lunch tomorrow. I'll let you know what it's like.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I've spent a lot of time in Connecticut. I've heard a story that apizza isn't quite the same as pizza - that it's the Neapolitan version (or something like that, I'm too lazy to look it up right now, but I'm sure our good friend Google can find it).
    I've lived in Salerno and worked in Naples for the last 35 years:). 'Apizza' to me sounds like the English rendering of the Neapolitan dialect 'a pizza (which means 'the pizza'). I doubt very much that it refers to a Neapolitan version of a pizza, as pizza was invented in Naples and therefore any kind of pizza which is not made as they make it here is a 'version'. It's more likely that a Neapolitan immigrant opened up a pizza place in Connecticut and the locals latched onto his dialect.:)

    That said, to people who live here a what is known as a 'Neapolitan pizza' (English translation, of course) is just tomato, garlic and oregano (no mozzarella or any other kind of cheese).

    And I've never heard 'pizza shop' in the UK. Pizza place/pizzeria is more common, as heypresto mentions above.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    'Apizza' to me sounds like the English rendering of the Neapolitan dialect 'a pizza (which means 'the pizza'). I doubt very much that it refers to a Neapolitan version of a pizza, as pizza was invented in Naples and therefore any kind of pizza which is not made as they make it here is a 'version'. It's more likely that a Neapolitan immigrant opened up a pizza place in Connecticut and the locals latched onto his dialect.:)
    A lot of Sicilians and Calabresi moved there at the end of the nineteenth century. They also say 'a pizza' to mean the pizza. :)
     

    Highland Thing

    Senior Member
    English, Welsh
    "Pizza shop" is common in Britain. It sounds metropolitan/pretentious to call it 'pizzeria'. There are places in Scotland where you might even get beaten up for it.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "Pizza shop" is common in Britain. It sounds metropolitan/pretentious to call it 'pizzeria'. There are places in Scotland where you might even get beaten up for it.
    Blimey!:D I've come across a fair number of 'pizzerias' (English plural.....:eek:) in London: when I go back I will have to remember to keep a look-out for 'pizza shops', which is a new one on me. I don't use the Italian word when speaking English, by the way, but that's probably just me: I do the same in Italian, i.e. I avoid using English words, even if the italians do, if there's a perfectly good Italian word I can use instead.
     

    Highland Thing

    Senior Member
    English, Welsh
    I'm guessing that 236 Leith Walk in Edinburgh, where you'll find Origano Cafe and Pizzeria, isn't one of those places. :)
    Or these places either (from Google Maps).:)
    I don't think that Edinburgh is a good example to give of somewhere non-metropolitan/pretentious! And even if a business calls itself 'pizzeria' - presumably because the proprietor wants to appear on a level (or three) above a mere 'pizza shop' - people will still call it what they choose to call it. Haberdasheries still exist, for example, but only an elite few would ever call it that.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I don't think that Edinburgh is a good example to give of somewhere non-metropolitan/pretentious! And even if a business calls itself 'pizzeria' - presumably because the proprietor wants to appear on a level (or three) above a mere 'pizza shop' - people will still call it what they choose to call it. Haberdasheries still exist, for example, but only an elite few would ever call it that.
    What about the other places on the link I provided to Google Maps above? They're all over Scotland.:)
     

    Highland Thing

    Senior Member
    English, Welsh
    What about the other places on the link I provided to Google Maps above? They're all over Scotland.:)
    The second part of my answer applies. In any case, I didn't say that *no one* used 'pizzeria'. I think I may be the only person in Scotland who pronounces the names of different pastas in the Italian way, but I'd still say 'pizza shop', because it's a perfectly good English translation for an Italian word. And 'pizza shop' is the only term I've ever heard (in 10 years in Scotland) anyone use for it. But I've never been to Edinburgh.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "Pizza shop" is common in Britain. It sounds metropolitan/pretentious to call it 'pizzeria'.
    <…> I must remember this every time I see the name Pizzeria in the UK.
    <-----Off-topic comments removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    For example, the NOW Corpus (available online) has 422 examples of pizza shop, nearly all of which come from or refer to countries outside the UK, often the USA.
    For pizzeria, there are 2153 examples, many more of which are from the UK.

    In the town where I live, there are several restaurants which call themselves pizzeria.

    See also Google Ngram Viewer
     
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    marcbatco

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    I've lived in Salerno and worked in Naples for the last 35 years:). 'Apizza' to me sounds like the English rendering of the Neapolitan dialect 'a pizza (which means 'the pizza'). I doubt very much that it refers to a Neapolitan version of a pizza, as pizza was invented in Naples and therefore any kind of pizza which is not made as they make it here is a 'version'. It's more likely that a Neapolitan immigrant opened up a pizza place in Connecticut and the locals latched onto his dialect.:)

    That said, to people who live here a what is known as a 'Neapolitan pizza' (English translation, of course) is just tomato, garlic and oregano (no mozzarella or any other kind of cheese).

    And I've never heard 'pizza shop' in the UK. Pizza place/pizzeria is more common, as heypresto mentions above.
    Actually, london calling, in Italy (in particular, in the North), there is a Neapolitan version of pizza which is smaller and with higher edges.
    What do you mean with latched onto his dialect?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Actually, london calling, in Italy (in particular, in the North), there is a Neapolitan version of pizza, which is smaller and with higher edges.
    What do you mean with latched onto his dialect?
    In Naples the original, traditional Neapolitan pizza (Pizza alla Marinara, sorry Mods) is as I described it my post above: I know some people add basil to it as well, but local purists don't agree with that. It definitely is not 'smaller', as per the version (and I underline version;)) you describe: it's actually very large. It has high edges, but then all local pizzas have high edges, so no surprise there.:)

    For those who have never seen an original Neapolitan pizza, here's a photo of the real McCoy (source: scattidigusto.it):



    By 'latched onto his dialect' I meant they heard him say 'a pizza, assumed that it was one word and have used it ever since to mean 'pizza'.
     
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    Highland Thing

    Senior Member
    English, Welsh
    I must remember this every time I see the name Pizzeria in the UK.
    <…>Whether or not you *see* the name 'Pizzeria' is completely irrelevant.<…> The OP concerns what is HEARD, NOT what is written. <-----Comments responding to now-deleted post removed by moderator (Florentia52, moderator)----->
     
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    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Keith Bradford (#15) gave some good evidence on the frequency of the different terms.
    You can add "pizza joint" to those that he investigated, and on the Ngram Viewer you can play with the difference between British and American usage.
    Just bear in mind that the Viewer is counting words that appear in published books. You have to judge for yourself how well they reflect present day speech.
    Highland Thing (#22) also makes a good point: "Pizzeria" in the title of a business doesn't necessarily mean the customers call it that generically.
    On another thread a few weeks ago I claimed I had never heard of a "pizza shop";
    but a few days later the local newspaper headline was about a robbery at a "pizza shop". Who knew?
    Are any of you old enough to remember when the dish was called "pizza pie"? See the lyrics of "That's Amore".
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The original question has been abundantly answered.

    This interesting topic invites interesting side discussions, which are, unfortunately, topic drift.

    This thread is closed.

    Thank you all for participating.

    Cagey, moderator.
     
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