place of dollar sign

vachecow

Senior Member
USA English
I saw a French book magasine, but all of the prices were in dollars. But instead of writing the price as $5.00, they had 5$, and so on and so forth. Is that normal?
 
  • Karl K

    Member
    Canada/English/French
    vachecow121 said:
    I saw a French book magasine, but all of the prices were in dollars. But instead of writing the price as $5.00, they had 5$, and so on and so forth. Is that normal?
    In Canada that's indeed the official way of displaying a dollar sign in French. Rules appear to be loose in most French-speaking countries, as egueule mentions USD is commonly used in Europe. Canada's currency, however, is the dollar and therefore they have an "official way" of displaying it, after the value numeral (either 5$ or 5.00$ is acceptable). In French Canada 5 USD is rendered as 5$US or 5.00$US
     

    Shark

    Senior Member
    France - French
    Indeed in French we put the sign of the currency after the amount: it's the case for every currencies: one British pound = 1£; one euro= 1¤; etc...

    Just a little question: don't you think it's more logical? Just teasing you... ;)
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    well, actually I do think that it is more logical, because when talking, whether in French or in English, you say "dollar" after the amount.

    Ex.: fifty dollars ($50) = cinquante dollars (50$)
     

    foucrazyfoucrazy

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    In Canada, in English, you'd write "$5" for "five dollars."
    In French, it would be "5$" for "five dollars."
    I think "5" followed by the dollar sign ($) makes more sense because it reads "five dollars" instead of the English way: "dollars five."

    Well... I hope that helped you somewhat. If not... oh well.
     

    Procol

    Senior Member
    British English
    Publicité : You would write "3 milliards de $" ou "3 milliards de dollars". Regarding this whole thread, the rule is simple. In English, sums are written with the dollar/pound/euro/yen sign before the sum, in French it comes after. So €30 in English, 30 € in French.
     
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