place where troops are stationed

What do we call the place where troops are stationed?
The sentence is:
The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time at ......and rarely participate in active operations against militant groups.
I mean not the building but abstractly. Disposition?
 
  • ...now spend more time in barracks, and rarely participate in active operations...

    No, no, that`s what I was saying. It is not the actual buildings or barracks I am talking about, rather areas to which they are restricted, this is part of the policy which prevents the Federal Forces from meddling into conflicts on the whole territory of the republic.
     

    sloopjc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It is not the actual buildings or barracks I am talking about, rather areas to which they are restricted...
    I have a problem making a distinction here. What are areas in this context, if not physical spaces? I suppose you mean "areas" of their work, i.e. duties.

    "The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time at..."

    When a soldier isn't on duty, isn't he at ease?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I have a problem making a distinction here. What are areas in this context, if not physical spaces? I suppose you mean "areas" of their work, i.e. duties.

    "The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time at..."

    When a soldier isn't on duty, isn't he at ease?
    I would say the opposite of "on duty" is "off duty", unless they have left the base, in which case I would say, "at liberty" or "on leave."
     

    sloopjc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I would say the opposite of "on duty" is "off duty", unless they have left the base, in which case I would say, "at liberty" or "on leave."
    The opposite may be true, JM. I confess to know nothing of life in the military, but unlike police officers, who are clearly on or off-duty, I'd always imagined that soldiers "at-ease" were merely resting.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    What do we call the place where troops are stationed?
    The sentence is:
    The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time at ......and rarely participate in active operations against militant groups.
    I mean not the building but abstractly. Disposition?
    Maybe "on base" (as opposed to off base). Or "on training" (as opposed to on operations)?

    Loob
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The opposite may be true, JM. I confess to know nothing of life in the military, but unlike police officers, who are clearly on or off-duty, I'd always imagined that soldiers "at-ease" were merely resting.
    "At ease" is a particular way of standing in formation, as far as I know, that is the opposite of "at attention." I don't think "at ease" has anything to do with being off duty.

    www.m-w.com gives this definition of "at ease":

    b : standing silently (as in a military formation) with the feet apart, the right foot in place, and one or both hands behind the body -- often used as a command
     
    I have a problem making a distinction here. What are areas in this context, if not physical spaces? I suppose you mean "areas" of their work, i.e. duties.

    "The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time at..."

    When a soldier isn't on duty, isn't he at ease?

    Sorry, I am probably not being quite clear here. I do not mean any facilities, premises, barracks or anything of that kind.
    I mean the areas as territories of the republic to which the troops are assigned and that their presence is restricted to these areas.
    I should have probably provided the rest of the context:
    "The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time at...Only special task units continue to actively operate in the mountaneous regions."

    So for the rest they remain where they are assigned to, for example, one battalion is deployed in Argun and keeps to this city, they do not carry out operation outside of it in the republic.
     
    Maybe "on base" is a good idea although I originally wanted to give it a wider meaning. Eg: if Battalion X is deployed in Argun, then Argun is their.....

    It would be literally translated as "a deployment area". I mean, I am an English speaker, I can translate it but I am wondering whether there is an adopted more or less "military" term for that. I am sure I know it , it is just not coming at the moment.
     

    Terry Morti

    Senior Member
    UK
    What do we call the place where troops are stationed?
    The sentence is:
    The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time at ......and rarely participate in active operations against militant groups.
    I mean not the building but abstractly. Disposition?
    The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend more time confined to barracks and rarely participate in active operations against militant groups.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    If you, and we, can't think of a suitable expression for this, you could use a geographical term for where they do operate, rather as you described the no-go areas as mountainous regions.

    My use of no-go areas was deliberate, that's what the areas the troops avoided here were called. Unfortunately, that's the opposite of what you are looking for. Would "in safe areas" be close?

    The majority of the troops belonging to the Russian Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Defence stationed in the Chechen Republic now spend most of their time in safe areas and rarely participate in active operations against militant groups.

    What about ... on routine patrols ...?
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Perhaps you are thinking of 'jurisdiction' or 'administrative area' -- specifically in this case 'military jurisdiction' or 'military administrative area'.

    The place where troops are stationed is 'a base' but the larger area that they patrol, have control or authority over, or serve in whatever other capacity within that area, is their 'jurisdiction' or 'administration area'.

    "Battalion X's jurisdiction is the Argun region."
     

    winklepicker

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    Sorry, I am probably not being quite clear here. I do not mean any facilities, premises, barracks or anything of that kind... I should have probably provided the rest of the context
    Dear Setwale,

    Another time, it would be really great if we could have the context earlier than post #13!

    Sgt W Picker, Context Police.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    To elaborate on Josh's contribution. The term you are searching for is likely to be a term designated by the military establishment and handed down to the commander of the area involved. In other words, some bureaucratic term would be assigned to that area. A term such as "MILITARY ZONE." "FRIENDLY ZONE." etc. Generally the Press or other Media will pick up the military jargon. Plain English is not they way things in the military are called. Remember Viet Nam? BATTLE CASUALTIES, the plain English which meant dead was replaced by BODY COUNT.
     

    I.C.

    Senior Member
    D
    For specific meanings there are all kinds of specific terms, area of responsibility, area of operations, free-fire-zone and so on.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Dear Setwale,

    Another time, it would be really great if we could have the context earlier than post #13!

    Sgt W Picker, Context Police.
    Yeah, like the man said!

    We still don't know what sort of work this phrase is to appear in, or
    what kind of audience will be reading it.
    Will the reader be at all aware of military terminology, or are they
    part of the international paper pushers' establishment who prefer
    a high syllable count to direct speech?
    These things do matter.

    No context and no background lead to long, not necessarily productive,
    guessing games.
     
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