plastic container to carry home a slice of cake

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susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi there,

What's the word for those plastic containers you get at a bakery when you buy slices of cake or cupcakes? You'll see some of them if you search on Google images with the Romanian casoleta.

Thanks!
 
  • DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    There may be a specialised term which is used within the industry, but I've never heard anyone use anything other than (plastic) "container", "box" or "tray". A quick check on a catering supplies website suggests only "container".
     

    -mack-

    Senior Member
    American English
    I honestly cannot think of a term other than "plastic container," "container," or "box." "Take-out box" possibly, but only if it was from a restaurant.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    <<...>>

    That said, I don't think that's what the original question is about, and I don't know of any word for them other than "plastic container." I might say "square plastic container," to tell them from the round ones that delis use for cole slaw and potato salad.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    What's the word for those plastic containers you get at a bakery when you buy slices of cake or cupcakes? You'll see some of them if you search on Google images with the Romanian casoleta.
    Why don't you do the Google Imaging and show us what you mean? There are many images on the resulting page. Do you mean this thing?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Moderator note: To those who invite us to Google for images, please don't. Google the image you'd like us to see and link it here.
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi everyone, sorry for the confusion. Yes, I should have linked to an image. I did mean the plastic container that Copyright linked to, yes. I can see why I would call it square, to differentiate it from the round ones, but even though it has 90-degree corners, it's in fact rectangular -- but I can't say "rectangular plastic container," can I? It sounds too . . . clunky.
     
    Last edited:

    Hau Ruck

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Another term used quite often for carrying something home is "a to-go box." I have no idea if that applies to BE, but in AE we use that phrase quite often. It does not differentiate the material the container consists of, but it is a common way to ask for a container to take food home in.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The linked picture is of "cakes in a see-through plastic box." - that is an informal term. The formal term is "food-grade plastic container." although I suspect that "food-grade plastic" is better put as some sort of chemical name. This plastic has a greater purity than plastics used for non-food packaging, .i.e there is nothing awful that can leach out into the food.
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    The linked picture is of "cakes in a see-through plastic box." - that is an informal term. The formal term is "food-grade plastic container." although I suspect that "food-grade plastic" is better put as some sort of chemical name. This plastic has a greater purity than plastics used for non-food packaging, .i.e there is nothing awful that can leach out into the food.
    Interesting. Thank you, PaulQ!
    As a side note, your answer led me to search for "food-grade plastic container" and apparently you can't reuse them too many times! So I learned that as well.
    Thanks!
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Would you believe me if I wrote, "A cake-box"?

    GF..

    They used to be made of cardboard not plastic.... and they still are where I buy my cakes...........
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi George French!:) It's good to see I have so many choices besides "plastic container," after all. I have decided not to decide, but rather use them as the mood strikes me:).
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The trade term for these plastic containers is clamshell.
    Clamshell is a pleasantly descriptive term for all containers that open/close in this manner.
    According to the Webstaurantstore.com these are called "pie wedge takeout containers".
    ...
    This very eloquently illustrates that there is no simple English term for such containers. There appears to be no alternative, even within the food packaging industry, to using a cumbersome descriptive sequence.
     
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