Play music loud

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  • Cannister7

    Senior Member
    English, England
    Hi'

    You should say

    'she plays music loudly' Because loudly would be the adjective which applies to the verb 'to play'

    You could say 'she plays loud music' because this would make loud an adjective.

    That said, people do often say things like;

    'she plays music loud' or 'he did it very quick' but technically, I believe it is incorrect.
     

    Cannister7

    Senior Member
    English, England
    Hmm, I'm not the expert, but I don't think so, they would generally have an ly ending, except for some obvious exceptions like fast, and well. (He ran fast, and did it well)

    Actually, now I come to think about it fast might not even be an adverb, perhaps it's strictly correct to say quickly.

    So no, I don't think loud can ever strictly be an adverb, but it doesn't sound terrible to say it the way you did, and certainly I think they use that way more in America than we do in England.

    I hope that helps, someone else with a clearer understanding of English grammar might be able to add something, it's been a while since I was at school!
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks, Cannister. But isn't "loud" also an adverb?
    I don't think "loud" can ever be an adverb, Hotmale. "Louder", "loudly" and "loudest" would be adverbs but "loud" can only modify a noun ie:

    "What's that loud noise?", "The music is loud", "The car is loud", "That person is loud", "That striped sports jacket is loud", etc.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Thanks for your posts :)

    Cheers, Hotmale.
    There are at least a few words in modern English that are the same when used as adjectives or adverbs, at least in some structures:

    Play it loud (loudly).
    Play it fast (quickly, since "fastly" does not exist).
    Play it right (correctly).
    Don't play it wrong (incorrectly).

    I have no reason why this has occurred, and perhaps it is still happening. Could it be simplification of language over time?

    Gaer
     

    Hotmale

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hi Gaer,
    that is very interesting what you wrote. Could this be, however, only AmE thing?
     

    dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    It looks to me as though loud is listed as an adverb in both the NOAD and OED, which leads me to believe that it is accepted as an adverb in both AE and BE.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    "Play it loud" is correct. Loud is an objective complement modifying it. It's analogous to "paint it black."

    "Play it loudly" is awkward and wrong-sounding to my ear, unless we're talking about people actually playing music, which is to say making music with musical instruments. Even so, a conductor would more likely say "play it loud" than "play it loudly." Even the time-honored annotations, adopted from Italian, are adjectives. Pianissimo, not pianissimamente. Lento, not lentamente.

    "Play it loudly" sounds as dumb if you're talking about "playing" it on the radio, stereo or ipod-- as "turn the sound uply" would. If you turn the sound up, it will be loud or louder. Not loudly.
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I disagree. "Play it loudly" is correct. "Play it loud" is now common usage in spoken language (and advertising copy), but it should be "loudly." I do conduct, and I say "sing it loudly" or "sing it quietly/softly" to my choir, not "sing it soft", "sing it quiet", "sing it loud".

    I don't think it sounds dumb at all. You wouldn't say, "He proclaimed it loud throughout the land." It's the same construction, only it has a colloquial equivalent when talking about "playing it".
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I disagree. "Play it loudly" is correct. "Play it loud" is now common usage in spoken language (and advertising copy), but it should be "loudly." I do conduct, and I say "sing it loudly" or "sing it quietly/softly" to my choir, not "sing it soft", "sing it quiet", "sing it loud".

    I don't think it sounds dumb at all. You wouldn't say, "He proclaimed it loud throughout the land." It's the same construction, only it has a colloquial equivalent when talking about "playing it".
    I disagree. "Play it loudly" is correctly. "Play it loud" is now common usage in spoken language (and advertising copy), but it should be "loudly." I do conduct, and I say "sing it loudly" or "sing it quietly/softly" to my choir, not "sing it soft", "sing it quiet", "sing it loud".
    I would use "loud" for music, but I would have no objection to "loudly". I don't think the origin of both forms necessarily has anything to do with advertising. I think this has to do with the fact that our language is "capricious". ;)

    Gaer
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    You can talk, shout, proclaim, sing, or play music loudly. To my ear this only applies, however, if you are really playing music.

    If you are using a machine that reproduces sound electronically, you do not play that machine in the same sense that you play the cello. You turn it on or off, you turn it up or down. You don't play the the stereo, though you might play some music on the stereo. And if someone doesn't hear it, they will ask you to play it louder.

    Same thing will happen if you use dark grey paint-- someone will say "paint it blacker." Not "paint it more blackly."
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    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I didn't say you would say, "Play it more loudly" when referring to a stereo. I don't think your "paint it black" analogy applies here. If we're drawing a comparison to painting, it would be more analogous to compare "paint it quickly" (the manner in which you paint it) rather than "paint it quick."

    In "play it loudly", "loudly" is an adverb modifying "play" - it is telling you how to play it. In "paint it quickly", "quickly" is an adverb modifying "paint" - it is telling you how to paint it.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    No, it is not telling you how to play it. It's telling you what the result should be.

    Play it loud. = Play it so that it is loud.

    just like

    Paint it black. = Paint it so that it is black.

    How you paint it is irrelevant. As long as it's black in the end, I'm happy. Same with the stereo. As long as you can get it to be loud in the end, I'm happy; it doesn't matter how you do it.

    This is, I believe, FFB's perspective. And I think I agree with it. :)
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    You can talk, shout, proclaim, sing, or play music loudly. To my ear this only applies, however, if you are really playing music.
    As my previous post indicates, I'm on the "loudly" side on this one. The original sample sentence was "She plays music loud" and, for argument's sake, we are assuming that it's a radio or CD or whatever - she is not playing an instrument. Can we then say:

    "She plays music soft" or "She plays music quiet"?
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I think some people are assuming that "soft" and "loud" are used exactly the same way—grammatically. This is logical, but using this logic you assume that adverbs do not exist that have dropped the "ly" unless they have antonyms that follow the exact same structure.

    In this case (soft/loud, softly/loudly) this MAY be true, but it may not be.

    My point is that if English were this logical and predictable, half the threads in this forum would not even be started.

    Gaer
     

    quitejaded

    Senior Member
    English, USA (texas)
    People may say that in conversation where rules are leniant and forgivable, but it is not proper.

    "We play loud music"
    or
    "We play music loudly"

    depending on what you want to convey.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Loud (adverb) is listed in the OED with examples going back many centuries :)
    But the normal adverb is loudly, and there are many who consider it is the only version.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Loud (adverb) is listed in the OED with examples going back many centuries :)
    But the normal adverb is loudly, and there are many who consider it is the only version.
    As always I wonder why people are so eager to consider a usage going back many centuries as wrong. ;)

    Gaer
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    Hi,
    Can I say "She plays music loud"? Would this be correct?

    Thank you.
    You can say: "She plays loud music" (loud = adjective)

    Or she plays it loud. (loud = adverb).

    As other people have said, it can be an adjective or an adverb, but it depends on the sentence.
     

    Lucretia

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hello,
    A.S.Hornby:
    loud - adv.(after talk, speak, laugh etc) in a loud manner: Don't talk so loud! They laughed loud and long.
    loudly -adv. in a loud manner: Someone knocked loudly at the door. What a loudly dressed girl!
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Would you consider it to be a simplification over time or something that was in fact organic i.e. the transformation of loud into an adverb as well as an adjective? I just feel that its a case of the former that has caught on colloquially so much so that hearing the original form sounds awkwardly pedantic.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Would you consider it to be a simplification over time or something that was in fact organic i.e. the transformation of loud into an adverb as well as an adjective? I just feel that its a case of the former that has caught on colloquially so much so that hearing the original form sounds awkwardly pedantic.
    Hmmm. That is possible but not what is happening here.
    Can I say "She plays music loud"? Would this be correct?
    Yes, you can, it is correct. Loud is an adjective. Compare "She arrives drunk" -> Drunk is the descriptive complement of "She arrives".

    "Paint it black" is correct, just as "I painted the door black" is correct -> black is a resultative adjective acting as a complement of (the imperative) "paint".
    Compare: "I hammered it flat." and "I shot him dead." -> I hammered it and (as a result) it was/became flat." - I shot him and (as a result) he was/became dead."
     
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