Please close the door

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  • robo

    New Member
    ru
    Whodunit said:
    Hey, great. :)

    I'm interested in why you do not pronounce the letters ո and ը. I'd read the word as "dvure" instead of "dur". The other word is clear but the first one puzzles me a bit. :)
    դ - d
    ու - u (one letter and one sound)
    ռ - r (soft)
    ը - (ә)

    ը in last position of word is:
    1) indeterminate article,
    2) unstressed sound,
    3) indefinite sound.
    For foreigner it's better do not pronounce it or pronounce like half duration of english (ә).

    see http://dictionary.hayastan.com/index.php?a=term&d=1&t=2312
    and http://dictionary.hayastan.com/index.php?a=term&d=1&t=8018
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    GUJARATI:
    Maherbaani kareenay darvazaa band kari dejo.

    URDU:
    Maherbaani farmaa kar darvaazaa band kij-ye.

    (notice the similarity..!)
    If you want, i can write that in hindi script for you.. i won't be able to in Gujarati, not because i can't read it, but because i just haven't got the means to do it..
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    linguist786 said:
    GUJARATI:
    Maherbaani kareenay darvazaa band kari dejo.

    URDU:
    Maherbaani farmaa kar darvaazaa band kij-ye.

    (notice the similarity..!)
    If you want, i can write that in hindi script for you.. i won't be able to in Gujarati, not because i can't read it, but because i just haven't got the means to do it..
    Hi and thank you very much. :)

    Someone posted this برائى مهربانى دروازه دين كر بند.)) before. Considering your transcription and that writing, they have almost no similarity. Plus, I know that Hindi and Urdu are very similar, so I'm surprised that the version in Arabic/Urdu letters totally differs from yours.

    I'd appreciate very much if you could add the Hindi script. Why don't you "paint" the Gujarati version and attach it to the post? :)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Note: Please do not post suggestions for languages that have already been mentioned. I don't want to have all those repeated posts deleted, but please stop posting everything two or three times. You can discuss proposed translations, as long as it doesn't get chatty. Thank you. :)
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Whodunit said:
    Hi and thank you very much. :)

    Someone posted this برائى مهربانى دروازه دين كر بند.)) before. Considering your transcription and that writing, they have almost no similarity. Plus, I know that Hindi and Urdu are very similar, so I'm surprised that the version in Arabic/Urdu letters totally differs from yours.

    I'd appreciate very much if you could add the Hindi script. Why don't you "paint" the Gujarati version and attach it to the post? :)
    how do you know they have no similarity? can you read urdu?
    (i'm not being funny lol, i'm just asking genuinely)

    anyway:

    the difference between mine and the other persons is that he's started with "baraaee maherbaani" whereas i've started with just "maherbaani" - both are really the same, except the first one is a bit more emphatic - a bit like "please please close the door.." lol i'm sure they not that desperate!! (but it would be used on notices and stuff) tbh, they both just as valid.
    the other difference is the ending of his and mine - i think his sounds a bit abrupt at the end and personally, i believe mine is slightly better because polite requests tend always to end in "..(whatever).. keej-ye".
    and finally, the last difference is that i've just put "maherbaani farma kar" - really no difference there. you could also say "maherbaani kar ke" actually.
    PLEASE NOTE I AM BEING REALLY NITPICKY HERE AND I HAVE NO INTENTION OF SOUNDING AS THOUGH I'M A KNOW-IT-ALL! LOL

    i'll tell you what actually - his urdu version is actually fine. leave it like it is - it's just right. In Hindi, however, it is written like this:

    महेरबानी कर के दरवाज़ा बन्द की जिए
    (Maherbaani kar ke darwaazaa band keej-ye)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    linguist786 said:
    how do you know they have no similarity? can you read urdu?
    (i'm not being funny lol, i'm just asking genuinely)
    No, but I can read Arabic, which uses the same letters. Of course, the Arabic and Urdu sounds of their letters differ. ;)

    the difference between mine and the other persons is that he's started with "baraaee maherbaani" whereas i've started with just "maherbaani" - both are really the same, except the first one is a bit more emphatic - a bit like "please please close the door.." lol i'm sure they not that desperate!! (but it would be used on notices and stuff) tbh, they both just as valid.
    the other difference is the ending of his and mine - i think his sounds a bit abrupt at the end and personally, i believe mine is slightly better because polite requests tend always to end in "..(whatever).. keej-ye".
    and finally, the last difference is that i've just put "maherbaani farma kar" - really no difference there. you could also say "maherbaani kar ke" actually.
    PLEASE NOTE I AM BEING REALLY NITPICKY HERE AND I HAVE NO INTENTION OF SOUNDING AS THOUGH I'M A KNOW-IT-ALL! LOL
    Thanks for the thorough explanation. If you gave me your version in Urdu letters, I'd take yours. I don't want to try myselft, because you'd just laugh what I'd write. :)

    महेरबानी कर के दरवाज़ा बन्द कीज्ये
    (Maherbaani kar ke darwaazaa band keej-ye)
    Great! Thank you so much. :)

     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    linguist786 said:
    and Gujarati.. (this is definitely right!)
    Got it! I tried to type your translation and this is what I've gotten:


    કરી દેશો દરવાજો ખંદ મહે રખાની કરીને.

    Please tell me if you can read it and whether or not there are mistakes. :)
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Whodunit said:
    Got it! I tried to type your translation and this is what I've gotten:


    કરી દેશો દરવાજો ખંદ મહે રખાની કરીને.

    Please tell me if you can read it and whether or not there are mistakes. :)
    sorry to be frank but that really doesn't make any sense!

    Where did you get this from anyway?

    eg - for the word "close" you've got "khand" where it should actually be "band"! see the next post..
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    linguist786 said:
    sorry to be frank but that really doesn't make any sense!

    Where did you get this from anyway?

    eg - for the word "close" you've got "khand" where it should actually be "band"! see the next post..
    Ooohh! Now I know what my problem was. I simply mixed up the word order through copying/pasting. My words weren't not too wrong, simply in the wrong place. ;)

    Thank you again. I'll add the Gujarati version to my list now. :)
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    oh yeh, i've edited my hindi version - just the last bit was slightly wrong before.. it's definitely right now.
    (just if you're interested.. i wrote (phonetically) "keej-yay" before, but if you break it down, it is (strictly speaking) "kee-jiye" which i didn't realise.. it's right now)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    linguist786 said:
    True, except for "khand", which should have been "band" lol!! but i still don't know how you copied and pasted (from where?)
    From Word. :)

    I could've written it here as well, but I just did it in Word. I installed the Gujarati keyboard (explanation here) and opened the character map as additional help.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Whodunnit: just to add to your little collection of "correct me please", this is the hindi:

    महेरबानी कर के मेरी गलतीयां नीकालो

    and Gujarati:

    મહેરબાની કરીને મારી ભૂલોને કારશો

    lol just felt like doing that..
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    linguist786 said:
    Whodunnit: just to add to your little collection of "correct me please", this is the hindi:

    महेरबानी कर के मेरी गलतीयां नीकालो

    and Gujarati:

    મહેરબાની કરીને મારી ભૂલોને કારશો

    lol just felt like doing that..
    Although it doesn't belong here, I'll answer right now: I'd like to add more versions of "correct me please", but I can't inlcude more than 120 characters, and Mike has aleady been so kind to let my signature over 120 charcters when that rule with the maximum came into effect. Thank you anyway. :)
     

    optimistique

    Senior Member
    Whodunit said:
    Note: Please do not post suggestions for languages that have already been mentioned. I don't want to have all those repeated posts deleted, but please stop posting everything two or three times. You can discuss proposed translations, as long as it doesn't get chatty. Thank you. :)
    I hope you will forgive me my arrogance of thinking that I have a better version of those already proposed for Dutch ;): Gelieve de deur te sluiten.

    It is just as impersonal as the others (and just as infinite), only more polite, and I think, but that's personal of course, more esthetical use of the language, BUT suitable for AND used in the situation you want to use it for.

    (De) deur sluiten a.u.b./
    alstublieft I would not prefer because I think this use of the infinitive shows even less politeness than using an imperative. Though it may be used quite a lot, doesn't mean it's the best and most preferable option. But that's only my humble opinion.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    optimistique said:
    I hope you will forgive me my arrogance of thinking that I have a better version of those already proposed for Dutch ;): Gelieve de deur te sluiten.

    It is just as impersonal as the others (and just as infinite), only more polite, and I think, but that's personal of course, more esthetical use of the language, BUT suitable for AND used in the situation you want to use it for.

    (De) deur sluiten a.u.b./alstublieft I would not prefer because I think this use of the infinitive shows even less politeness than using an imperative. Though it may be used quite a lot, doesn't mean it's the best and most preferable option. But that's only my humble opinion.
    I don't need to forgive you, since you didn't do anything wrong. Of course, you can discuss everything about proposed translations here. ;)

    If you look at the German translation, you'll immediately recognize that I chose the infinitive, too. It sounds quite normal in German. If you, however, say that your Dutch version is more preferable, I won't doubt it. But it could be a topic of a new thread to discuss the difference between direct imperatives and infitives as imperatives. ;)

    Thank you for the remark.
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    charlie2 said:
    Another form that is quite common in Hong Kong : 請順手關門. This is actually Cantonese. The meaning is the same. (Please close the door as you go.)
    Isn't 閂 (saan1) Cantonese for "to close"?

    Whenever I hear my a Cantonese person here say "close the door!", I hear "閂門喇!" (saan mun laa!)

    Or when my parents tell me to close the window I hear something like, "閂窗門, 出便好凍" (close the windows, it's very cold outside).
     

    MingRaymond

    Senior Member
    HK Cantonese
    You are right, vince. 請順手關門 are words written on the doors. In Hong Kong, we speak Cantonese. We can also write Cantonese. But we also write Standard Chinese. Yes, sometimes you also see 請順手閂門,but it is not common.

    Ming
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    Thai
    If you are a guy:
    กรุณาปิดประตูด้วยครับ (standard) = karuna pid pratu duay krab
    กรุณาปิดประตูด้วยนะครับ (polite request)= karuna pid pratu duay nakrab
    If you are a girl:
    กรุณาปิดประตูด้วยค่ะ= karuna pid pratu duay kha
    กรุณาปิดประตูด้วยนะคะ= karuna pid pratu duay naka
     

    Oogami

    New Member
    None, from Singapore
    New to the forum, and I would like to second post #256's term for Bahasa Indonesia.

    My pick: "Mohon agar pintu ditutup." [(We) request that the door is to be closed.]
    In Bahasa Indonesia, [Please] translates into a few different words with different nuances. "Mohon" is commonly used to politely request for someone to do something, and is often used in signs/notices.

    The earliest entry of "Tutup pintu" is more of an oral imperative that means [Shut the door].

    Another one for Japanese:
    ドアを閉めて下さい。[Door close please]
    The previous entry contains the 'honorific' modifier 「お」 in お閉め.
    I do not think that this is necessary in the case of a sign. :D
     

    Carl. F.

    New Member
    Sweden, Swedish
    In Swedish:
    (If on a train) "Var vänlig och stäng dörren" (translates as: be so kind to close the door), this, however, sounds rude when interacting.
    When talking to someone you would more likely say: "Vill du (vara snäll och) stänga dörren?" (Would you [be so kind to] close the door?).
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    In Serbian:

    "Molim vas, zatvorite vrata" (Cyrillic "Молим вас, затворите врата").

    Sorry, if smo already posted it!
     

    beaveyOne

    New Member
    English, USA
    Whodunit said:
    In every language that has an accusative case, the word "to close" requires the accusative. Is there a difference in pronunciation between "duris" and durys"?
    "Durys" has the stress on the first syllable, and the "y" has a bit more of a long sound (but not much more). "Duris", in the accusative, has the stress on the second syllable, and the "i" is short.
     

    Zub

    Senior Member
    Catalan, Spanish
    In Spanish, another rude but funny way to say "close the door" to somebody who left it open is "Esa puerta!", which means "That door!" and should be said in loud voice.

    I wonder if the same formula exists in other languages.

    Z.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Zub said:
    In Spanish, another rude but funny way to say "close the door" to somebody who left it open is "Esa puerta!", which means "That door!" and should be said in loud voice.

    I wonder if the same formula exists in other languages.

    Z.
    I'm not talking bout slang commands, but about what could be seen on a sign.

    Confused Linguist, would you write it on a sign?
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Confused Linguist said:
    Bengali

    Doroja bondho koriben but I've never really seen this on a sign.
    Questions:

    That literally means "Close the door", doesn't it? (resembles Gujarati a lot!)

    Also, is there not a way of saying please in Bengali? :p

    Lastly, would this be right in Bengali script?:
    দোরোজা বোন্ধো কোরীবেন
     

    Confused Linguist

    Senior Member
    English & Bengali
    linguist786 said:
    Questions:

    That literally means "Close the door", doesn't it? (resembles Gujarati a lot!)

    Also, is there not a way of saying please in Bengali? :p

    Lastly, would this be right in Bengali script?:
    দোরোজা বোন্ধো কোরীবেন
    Dear Linguist786, there is no way of saying please in Bengali, but you can use the word ki and/or ektu to form polite requests.

    Would you please close the door?

    Apni ki dorjata (ektu) bondho korben?

    Dorjata ki (ektu) bondho korben?

    দোরোজা বোন্ধো কোরীবেন

    Just get rid of all the marks denoting the 'o' sound, and the 'i' sound in 'koriben' is a short vowel.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Confused Linguist said:
    Dear Linguist786, there is no way of saying please in Bengali, but you can use the word ki and/or ektu to form polite requests.

    Would you please close the door?

    Apni ki dorjata (ektu) bondho korben?

    Dorjata ki (ektu) bondho korben?

    দোরোজা বোন্ধো কোরীবেন

    Just get rid of all the marks denoting the 'o' sound, and the 'i' sound in 'koriben' is a short vowel.
    Thanks for that! :thumbsup:
    So would this be right: ডরজা বন্ধ করিবেন

    ? (I doubt it, but you're still going to have to tell me where I've gone wrong lol)
     

    Confused Linguist

    Senior Member
    English & Bengali
    linguist786 said:
    Thanks for that! :thumbsup:
    So would this be right: ডরজা বন্ধ করিবেন

    ? (I doubt it, but you're still going to have to tell me where I've gone wrong lol)
    Linguist, I made a mistake in my previous post. :eek: There is a way of saying please in Bengali - doya koriya - but it is extremely literal. I have never heard it used in everyday speech.

    ডরজা :cross:
    দরজা :tick:
    দরজা বন্ধ করিবেন :tick:
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Confused Linguist said:
    Linguist, I made a mistake in my previous post. :eek: There is a way of saying please in Bengali - doya koriya - but it is extremely literal. I have never heard it used in everyday speech.

    ডরজা :cross:
    দরজা :tick:
    দরজা বন্ধ করিবেন :tick:
    So, is the last one the correct translation for "Please close the door"? And is this the corresponding pronunciation: Doroja bondho koriben?
     
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