Please close the door

Confused Linguist

Senior Member
English & Bengali
Whodunit said:
So, is the last one the correct translation for "Please close the door"? And is this the corresponding pronunciation: Doroja bondho koriben?
The last one is the correct translation for "Please close the door" and is pronounced "doroja bondho koriben". You may also say, "Doya koriya dorojata bondho koriben." It does not matter if you leave out the first two words. ".... Koriben" is a polite way of asking someone to do something.
 
  • panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    /ektu/ is the same as /zaraa/ (a little).

    I don't know if I wrote in this thread already!

    Hindi/Urdu
    inform /darvaazaa ba.nd kar/
    inform (better) /darvaazaa ba.nd karo/
    formal /darvaazaa ba.nd kijie/

    Panjabi
    inform/buhaa ba.nd kar/
    formal/buhaa ba.nd karo/

    buhaa and darwaazaa are both used.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    panjabigator said:
    /ektu/ is the same as /zaraa/ (a little).

    I don't know if I wrote in this thread already!

    Hindi/Urdu
    inform /darvaazaa ba.nd kar/
    inform (better) /darvaazaa ba.nd karo/
    formal /darvaazaa ba.nd kijie/
    No, you didn't, I think. But here are eralier suggestion. Would you like to have a look at them?

    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?p=831571&highlight=urdu#post831571
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?p=457965&highlight=urdu#post457965

    Panjabi
    inform/buhaa ba.nd kar/
    formal/buhaa ba.nd karo/
    Would you mind to type it in Panjabi script? :)

    soulpaolo said:
    bahasa Indonesia: "Tolong tutup pintu"
    What do you think about this?
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    ਬੁਹਾ/ਦਰਵਾਜ਼ਾ ਬਂਦ ਕਰ(informal)/ਕਰੋ(formal). (The first two words, buhaa ਬੁਹਾ and darvaazaa ਦਰਵਾਜ਼ਾ are the same, but the first one is more hard-core Panjabi:)) Saying /mehrbaanii/ or /kripaayaa/ are ok but a bit informal and unnatural sounding to me. Panjabi (and Hindi, Urdu, and presumably Bengali and Gujarati) has a tense with the please and formality clause already built into it, so when speaking, you don't really need to say please explicitly. Instead, you can use the formal tense, and it will be understood that you are being polite and making a request. On written signs, I guess writing please out would be fine, but I don't have the best native eye for that because I have never lived in India nor have I been exposed to indic language signs that often. Next time I go I will pay attention.

    Saying ਜ਼ਰਾ ਦਰਵਾਜ਼ਾ ਬਂਦ ਕਰੋ (zaraa darvaazaa ba.nd karo) is more polite due to the usage of zaraa. Zaraa literally means "a little" but added on to a sentence, its meaning is more like please, and this structure is used very much in both spoken and written Panjabi (and Hindi). Hope this clears things up!

    I usually try and post things in the script as often as possible, but I never know if people care or not hehe. I will try and do it more often!
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Just for the record: Would you recommend the second sentence "ਜ਼ਰਾ ਦਰਵਾਜ਼ਾ ਬਂਦ ਕਰੋ" to me after all? After your explanation, this should be the correct phrase for my sign. :)

    And yes, I love reading as many exotic (;)) letters as possible.
     

    Insider

    Senior Member
    Ukraine (Ukrainian)
    In Ukrainian we usually say:

    Будь ласка, заченяйте двері!
    Bud laska, zachenyajte dveri! - transliterated version
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Whodunit/panjabigator:

    I can tell you that on signs, the word for "please" is written. So for the Urdu/Hindi/Gujarati, the word "maherbaani" would be written. I know this because in our mosque, signs are written in Urdu and one of them says "Baraaye maherbaani aap ki cheezo ki kudh hifaazat kijye" (Please look after your valuables).

    As for the "zaraa" business, I would say that is very colloquial and is used in speech. It would not likely be written on a sign in my opinion. (just for the record, the Gujarati equivalent of "zaraa" is "zaraak" :))

    Whodunit, I remember when I replied to this thread (a while ago!) and I didn't have the means to post in Gujarati script, so I posted an attachment with it on. Just to confirm that, here it is (since I do have the means now!):

    મહેરબાની કરીને દરવાજો બંદ કરી દેશો
    (maherbaani kareene darwaajo band karee desho)

    and I would say the final Hindi one would be:

    महेरबानी करके दरवाज़ा बंद कीजिए
    (maherbaani karke darwaazaa band kijiye)

    and Urdu:

    براۓ مہربانى دروازه بند كيجيے
    (Baraaye maherbaani darwaazaa band kijiye)
     

    panjabigator

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    No I agree. When I originally posted my message, I didn't realize I was writing it for a sign. Thats why I didn't write the /maherbaanii/ or /kripaa/ for please, because you could use the /aap/ tense and it would be considered polite.

    Is the Z pronounced in Zaraak? Is that the Bharuchi version or the Shudhh Guju version?:D

    For a sign in Panjabi: ਕਿਰਪਾ ਕਰਕੇ ਦਰਵਾਜ਼ਾ ਬਂਦ ਕਰੋ. Sorry about any confusion.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    panjabigator said:
    No I agree. When I originally posted my message, I didn't realize I was writing it for a sign. Thats why I didn't write the /maherbaanii/ or /kripaa/ for please, because you could use the /aap/ tense and it would be considered polite.

    Is the Z pronounced in Zaraak? Is that the Bharuchi version or the Shudhh Guju version?:D

    For a sign in Panjabi: ਕਿਰਪਾ ਕਰਕੇ ਦਰਵਾਜ਼ਾ ਬਂਦ ਕਰੋ. Sorry about any confusion.
    Yes, that's cool. I think I might open a thread about all this "polite request" and imperative problem.. there's so many ways of asking someone to do something!

    Oh yeah, I've just added the Urdu one (post above yours)

    So that's the Urdu/Hindi/Gujarati/Punjabi one sorted. :)
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Oh I see! Yes you were completely right. The problem is, I keep switching from Arabic keyboard to Urdu one, so the "h"s get muddled up. I actually thought it doesn't matter which one you put, but now I see it does! I've changed it now.. and will make sure I put the right one in future.
    And no - you don't sound like a broken record! Haha!

    By the way, I like your definition of the other "h" (do chasmi) :D:p
     

    ordequin

    Senior Member
    Castellano/ España
    haujavi said:
    In Basque:

    Mesedez, Itxi atea

    Mesedez(Please), itxi(close) atea(the door)
    Hi Haujavi, compatriot! Don't you think in EUSKERA,(basque), "ITXI ATEA MESEDEZ", instead of "Mesedez, itxi atea", will sound more natural, less forced?
    Greetings to all foers!
     

    moldo

    Senior Member
    Dutch, Netherlands
    Dutch alternatives:

    - Deur dicht svp *

    - Gaarne deur sluiten

    - Deur dicht doen alstublieft

    * "svp" is very often used in Dutch writing, especially signs in public places. It is short for "S'il vous plait". The French word which means please.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    At least I could show tobira is as good as ドア (< Eg. door).

    BTW, how can you be sure the poster was a girl??? Lin can be a boy's name.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Flaminius said:
    At least I could show tobira is as good as ドア (< Eg. door).

    BTW, how can you be sure the poster was a girl???
    Hehe.. good point! I don't actually know.. I just assumed "Lin" was a girl's name.. it is in England anyway.. I know a few Lins.. :D
     

    Abu Bishr

    Senior Member
    Afrikaans, South Africa
    moldo said:
    Dutch alternatives:


    - Gaarne deur sluiten



    I would think that (sluiten) means "to lock" rather than "to close" like in Afrikaans (sluit) or in German (gesloshen) if I'm correct.
     

    moldo

    Senior Member
    Dutch, Netherlands
    Whodunit said:
    Moldo, these commands don't sound like polite requests for a sign on a door. But this is just my impression from German, which is very close to Dutch, as you know.
    I am afraid that the Dutch are not very polite by nature. Adding the word "alstublieft" is already polite. Abroad the Dutch are often considered rude while they are not aware. In England they might forget to say please.
    Less polite is just shouting "Deur dicht!" ;)

    Extremely polite would be: "Zou u zou vriendelijk willen zijn om de deur dicht te doen?" There is a risk that it would sound sarcastic to an other Dutchman.

    Regards, Moldo
     

    moldo

    Senior Member
    Dutch, Netherlands
    Abu Bishr said:
    moldo said:
    Dutch alternatives:

    - Gaarne deur sluiten

    I would think that (sluiten) means "to lock" rather than "to close" like in Afrikaans (sluit) or in German (gesloshen) if I'm correct.
    "sluiten" could indeed mean "lock", but it can also be used for "close".

    Vice versa, I would translate "lock" with the Dutch phrase "op slot doen" which is more clearly and umambigiuosly "lock".

    Regards, Moldo
     

    Abu Bishr

    Senior Member
    Afrikaans, South Africa
    I suppose I should'nt try my hand at something that I'm not that familiar with. I'm still in the process of learning German. Anyhow, my point is (& I should'nt have brought German into it just because it sounds somewhat like Dutch or Afrikaans) that in Afrikaans (which is derived from Dutch) if you want to say: Close the door, please! you say: Maak die deur toe, asseblief! and if you want to say: Lock the door, please! you say: Sluit die deur, asseblief!

    On the basis of this I would assume that (sluiten) in Dutch would mean the same as (sluit) in Afrikaans, which in turn means (lock). That is essentially my point. As for German, native-speakers are knowledgeable about their language than non-native.
     

    moldo

    Senior Member
    Dutch, Netherlands
    Abu,

    I understand your point. However, it seems that Afrikaans has a subtle difference in the meaning of these words, compared with Dutch.

    In my English-Dutch dictionary I find:

    close = sluiten
    lock = op slot doen

    I agree with you that "sluiten" is also "lock".

    "close the door" can be translated both as:
    "sluit de deur" and;
    "doe de deur dicht" as well.

    "lock the door" can be translated as:
    "sluit de deur" and;
    "doe de deur op slot".

    I hope I have not confused you any more. May be we should start a forum about the similarities and differences between Dutch and Afrikaans.;)

    Regards, Moldo
     

    Abu Bishr

    Senior Member
    Afrikaans, South Africa
    Whodunit
    Whodunit said:
    Well, in German there is "schließen" (to close) and "verschließen" (to lock), if you are referring to this. :confused:
    Tell me, Is (zumachen) also another word for (close) in which case it will be the same as (toemaak) in Afrikaans.

    In hindsight, I think, a more polite way of saying (Close the door) in Afrikaans would be to say: Kan jy die deur toemaak, assebelief?! Even more politeful would be to put (u) in place of (jy), so that it reads: Kan u die deur toemaak asseblief?! More polite than all of these is to say: Sal u so gaaf wees om die deur toe te maak, asseblief?! (Would you be so kind as to close the door, please?!) But then again, this could also be use to intend sarcasm.

    So, if it is that (zumachen) means (close) - pending your confirmation obviously - then would it be correct to say in German: Kannst zu die Tür zumachen, Bitte?! which would mean the same as: Kan jy die deur toemaak, asseblief?! in Afrikaans?

    Anyhow, in general, it would seem to me that a request in the form of a question is more polite than a request in the form of a comman or order.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Let me clear up things now, as we are going a bit off-topic:

    For the German phrase, I chose "schließen", because 1) it includes "to lock", but it mainly used for "to close" and 2) infinitives can imply an imperative in German. In Dutch and Afrikaans, it might work as well, but I'm not sure:

    "De deur sluiten, alstublieft."
    "Die deur sluit, asseblief."
    "Tür bitten schließen."

    There are other possible requests, but I'm afraid you won't see them on a sign (people usually say them):

    "Schließen Sie bitte die Tür."

    That's why I wouldn't count these commands. Anyway, what would be the final Afrikaans translation now, Moldo Abu Bishr?

    PS: "zu machen" (AF: toemaak) is colloquial, and "dicht machen" (NL: dicht doen) sounds rude.
     

    moldo

    Senior Member
    Dutch, Netherlands
    Anyway, what would be the final Afrikaans translation now, Moldo?
    I am sorry, but I do not know Afrikaans.
    As a Dutchman, I only know that in the Netherlands "sluiten" does not necessarily mean "lock". Apparently, according to Abu Bishr, this is different in South Africa.
     

    paluszak

    Member
    Poland (Polish)
    First, there are two different ways of writing Chinese - simplified, as used in Mainland China and Singapore, and traditional, used everywhere else. 1st and 3rd example are written in traditional characters, 2nd, 4th and 5th in simplified. 4th example doesn't make much sense. 1st and 5th are identical and the most 'standard', only 'spelled' differently. 2nd example is grammatically correct, but it's not what I'd put on a door. 3rd example sounds Cantonese, so I suppose you could see it in HK, Macau, Guangdong and many overseas communities, but it's ok nonetheless.

    J.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    First, there are two different ways of writing Chinese - simplified, as used in Mainland China and Singapore, and traditional, used everywhere else. 1st and 3rd example are written in traditional characters, 2nd, 4th and 5th in simplified. 4th example doesn't make much sense. 1st and 5th are identical and the most 'standard', only 'spelled' differently. 2nd example is grammatically correct, but it's not what I'd put on a door. 3rd example sounds Cantonese, so I suppose you could see it in HK, Macau, Guangdong and many overseas communities, but it's ok nonetheless.

    J.
    Thanks, Paluszak, for your explanation. From what I have understood of your post, I'd use 請隨手關門, because it looks nicer than the simplified version.
     

    paluszak

    Member
    Poland (Polish)
    Thanks, Paluszak, for your explanation. From what I have understood of your post, I'd use 請隨手關門, because it looks nicer than the simplified version.
    Yep, looks much nicer and it's completely legitimate to use it everywhere, many people from the Mainland should also be able to read this.

    J.
     

    chaya

    Senior Member
    english (UK) French Spanish Italian
    HEBREW
    Na lisgor et hadelet
    Ani mevakesh/mevakeshet lisgor et hadelet (I kindly request...)
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    3rd example sounds Cantonese, so I suppose you could see it in HK, Macau, Guangdong and many overseas communities, but it's ok nonetheless.

    J.


    Actually, the Cantonese word for "to close" is not 關/关 (these are the Simplified and Traditional versions of the same character), but 閂 (saan).

    閂門! (Close the door!)
    閂窗門, 出便好凍 (Close the windows, it's cold outside)

    Unfortunately, Cantonese is never written outside of conversational contexts even in Hong Kong, therefore you will only see Mandarin-based Standard Written Chinese and therefore only see 關/关 (mostly the former since Hong Kong prefers Traditional).

    Check out this earlier post in this thread: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?p=882571&highlight=cantonese#post882571
     

    ea.passion

    Member
    Persian, Iran
    In Persian, we say.

    لطفاً در را ببندید
    (Lotfan Dar ra bebandid.)
    Lotfan= please
    dar= door
    ra= sign of direct object
    bebandid= 2nd person pl. imperative [bastan(inf.)]

    I hope that my reply is not so late for you.
     
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