Please feel free to make yourself at home

asaisaio

Banned
Chinese
When I was a student, I was told that the grammar is "make someone do something", such as "I make him do something", but why is "make yourself [at] home"? I think the correct sentence should be "Please feel free to make yourself [be] at home." Am I correct?
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    A) to make someone do something = "make" is transitive
    B) to make oneself at home = "make" is reflexive

    ("make" here is case B))
    You should please feel free to make yourself at home.
    Please feel free to make yourself at home.
    Feel free to make yourself at home.
    = Make yourself at home.
     

    asaisaio

    Banned
    Chinese
    A) to make someone do something = "make" is transitive
    B) to make oneself at home = "make" is reflexive

    ("make" here is case B))
    You should please feel free to make yourself at home.
    Please feel free to make yourself at home.
    Feel free to make yourself at home.
    = Make yourself at home.
    What does it mean by "reflexive"?
     

    asaisaio

    Banned
    Chinese
    A) to make someone do something = "make" is transitive
    B) to make oneself at home = "make" is reflexive

    ("make" here is case B))
    You should please feel free to make yourself at home.
    Please feel free to make yourself at home.
    Feel free to make yourself at home.
    = Make yourself at home.
    You don't explain why it is since you just tell me "make" is reflexive but I don't know the meaning of reflexive although I Google it.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    "Make yourself at home" is a set phrase...we (in AE) would say it without "feel free to."
    I'm a little surprised, Miss Julie. While I agree that "Make yourself at home" is a set phrase, it is very common to add "feel free to" where I'm originally from (WI). It's more polite and softens the imperative part of the reflexive phrase.

    I'm very familiar with both:
    Feel free to make yourself at home.
    Please feel free to make yourself at home.

    I googled for examples.
    https://www.google.com/search?outpu...b&q="feel+free+to+make+yourself+at+home"&btnK=

    Now, I can't speak for the South, but I can't imagine a simple "Make yourself at home", when they would maybe even add more words than "Northerners"/"Midwesterners" would.
     
    Last edited:

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    I'm a little surprised, Miss Julie. While I agree that "Make yourself at home" is a set phrase, it is very common to add "feel free to" where I'm originally from (WI). It's more polite and softens the imperative part of the reflexive phrase.

    I'm very familiar with both:
    Feel free to make yourself at home.
    Please feel free to make yourself at home.

    I googled for examples.
    https://www.google.com/search?outpu...b&q="feel+free+to+make+yourself+at+home"&btnK=

    Now, I can't speak for the South, but I can't imagine a simple "Make yourself at home", when they would maybe even add more words than "Northerners"/"Midwesterners" would.
    Note that I said "without 'feel free to'"...I didn't say to omit "please." ;)

    "Please make yourself at home" is the iteration of this phrase that I'm used to. :)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Note that I said "without 'feel free to'"...I didn't say to omit "please." ;)
    "Please make yourself at home" is the iteration of this phrase that I'm used to. :)
    Good point. After all, "please" means "if you please" or "if you like", which is already so close to "feel free" that to say both would border not only on redundant duplication, but also on unnecessary pleonasm, if you get my drift and take my meaning.
     
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