Please have a seat, your server will be right with you

sora no ryuu

Member
English
Hello. I want to say "Please have a seat, your server will be right with you."

すわっておねがいします. あなたのきゅうじそろそろができます

My Japanese is coming along nicely but it's a bit hard to figure out what is natural sounding without access to a native speaker.

I appreciate all your help.
 
  • Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    I have no idea about the second part but for the first part I think いらっしゃいませ。 おかけください。 is more likely to be heard in restaurants and the like. And あなた is something you don't want to say to customers or anyone else in Japan :)
     
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    wathavy

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Normally, server won't be mentioned.
    The latter half would be,
    ごちゅうもんをうかがいにまいりますまで、しばらくおまちください。
    "Please wait till someone come to ask your order."
     

    sora no ryuu

    Member
    English
    Thanks for your replies.

    Derselbe

    I understand the familiarity of anata, and I guess I don't see a problem with it in this context. I am not interested in going to Japan. I work at a steakhouse and we get the occasional Japanese customer. I don't want to say "Irrashaimase" (sp) or any other superfriendly greeting.

    I just want to say "Have a seat and wait." and not come across as a jerk.

    Wathavy

    "Gochuumon o ukagai ni mairimasu made, shibaraku omachi kudasai."

    I read that as:
    Your requested order will be called, there's a little waiting time please.

    Is that the natural way to say it?

    Thanks
     

    wathavy

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thanks for your replies.
    "Gochuumon o ukagai ni mairimasu made, shibaraku omachi kudasai."

    I read that as:
    Your requested order will be called, there's a little waiting time please.

    Is that the natural way to say it?
    The English direct translation of my version is.
    "Until someone come to take your order, please wait for some moment, thank you."

    While your interpretation clings to the time length customer may have to wait. So it is a little bit different, I guess.

    Cheers.
    :)
     

    lammn

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese
    I understand the familiarity of anata, and I guess I don't see a problem with it in this context. I am not interested in going to Japan. I work at a steakhouse and we get the occasional Japanese customer. I don't want to say "Irrashaimase" (sp) or any other superfriendly greeting.

    I just want to say "Have a seat and wait." and not come across as a jerk.
    Unfortunately it is very rude to refer your Japanese customer as "anata", no matter you are in or outside Japan.
    You should at least refer your Japanese customers as お客様(おきゃくさま).
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I work at a steakhouse and we get the occasional Japanese customer. I don't want to say "Irrashaimase" (sp) or any other superfriendly greeting.

    I just want to say "Have a seat and wait." and not come across as a jerk.

    Hi.
    I don't understand the bold portions.:confused:
    But I'm interested in the meaning.:)
    What kind of greeting does sora no ryuu not want to say?
    How does he feel about "irasshaimase"?
    What does superfriendly mean? It might be typo of "superficial"?
    He hates very friendly greeting and he wants to command Japanese customers just to sit and wait?

    Who is a jerk? sora no ryuu or Japanese customer?
    Please someone rephrase "not come across as a jerk".

    If I am understanding what he says correctly, I recommend to use
    "空いている席について、注文をとりにくるまでだまって待っててください。”
    ”aiteiru sekini tsuite, tyuumonn wo torini kurumade damatte mattete kudasai."

    Am I understanding correctly?
    Translation changes 180 degrees, depending upon Japanese costomers are favorable costomers for him or not.
     
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    kaito

    Senior Member
    German
    My understanding is that Sora does not want to appear too polite and not too impolite.
    Super-friendly means very friendly but it has the implication of being too friendly.
    He wants to ask his clients to sit and wait but does not want his clients to think that he is a jerk, so he wants to use a phrase that has the normal politeness level for that business but for some reason he thinks irasshaimase would be overly polite.
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Oh, thank you, kaito.
    Now I know the context.
    And mine was very bad expression.

    I think "Irasshaimase" is a very standard expression, not too polite, and not too impolite.

    And Wathavy's is very orthodox, sandard, natural Japanese, not too polite, and not too impolite.:thumbsup:
     

    Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    My understanding is that Sora does not want to appear too polite and not too impolite.
    If that is the case than maybe some native should tell him that Japanese people might consider "anata" nearly as an insult in a situation like this. The best you can hope for is that they think "yeah whatever, stupid gaijins just don't know it better ..." but they'll probably not feel very amused about that greeting. And they'll probably not come back.
     

    sora no ryuu

    Member
    English
    Questions about my context are being asked. Very well I will answer them.

    We are a very busy restaurant.

    I stand up front and control the flow of guests. There are often 50 or more people in the little alcove where I stand all crowded together. It is very loud. I want to say "PLEASE SIT DOWN AND WAIT AND A SERVER WILL BE WITH YOU. THERE IS NOTHING TO DO BUT SIT DOWN AND WAIT" It is very loud so I have to yell. This is not because I am a jerk but because we are on a 10 page wait and I can't answer all of their questions, or help them personally. I don't want to say "Welcome" with a smile as I barely have time to look up and because I am really just trying to help them figure out what to do when they are looking around upset and confused.

    "YOU MUST SIT DOWN AND WAIT. A SERVER WILL BE WITH YOU. " Smile.

    Move on.

    I am not rude but I cannot be polite or attentive in this situation. I have no time to say "Welcome, How are you? etc" even though I would like to. I don't greet the guests. I control the madness. There are two other people that guests go through before me that greet them and help out.

    Please let me clarify: I understand the context of anata and I am not a rude person, but yes "YOU MUST WAIT" is essentiallly what I want to say. I am telling them to wait, in a frenzied environment.

    My goal: Politeness takes a back seat to directness. When/if I go to Japan I will certainly speak politely.

    Thanks for your concern in trying to help me not appear rude. ;)
     
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    wathavy

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi, Sora no ryuu.
    (BTW, the dragon in the sky sounds harsh doesn't it?)

    I seem to understand properly how you are managing your customer at your restaurant. And that seems your shop should be very familiar with quite a few customers all over the world.
    It's great to know that.

    And you're just by yelling those words or sentence, I think most customer will understand what is going on even without knowing English at all.

    I don't believe those who visits your shop out of Japan does not know English at all, since they must have studied 10 years or less.
    So, never mind and keep doing the same. And only when you have recognized by any chance there are some Nippon jin, then you might as well try some Nihongo. That might be of great help for both of you, as you imagined of.;)

    I wish I could do the same with French. But there are no French around here. And my firm who has a sales branch in Holland never let me go. What a shame!

    Sorry. I was spitting things out of my system. :eek:

    Best regards. :)
     

    Morrow

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Please have a seat, your server will be right with you.
    This might work:
    saabaa ga suguni mairi-masu node, okake-ni natte omachi kudasai.

    Unfortunately, saabaa (which is actually a Japanised pronunciation of "server") is not a household word here. Instead of "saabaa," you could choose "kakari-no mono (someone in charge [of your table])" or "o-kyaku-sama go-tantoo no saabaa (saabaa, [someone] who is serving you - my customers)." The added underlined part will help Japanese people understand what you mean by "saabaa."

    Morrow
     
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