Please hold (telephone)

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eliot 96801

Senior Member
English (USA)
If I get a call from an Arabic speaker, and I want to tell them to hold the line while I get an interpreter, what is the easiest, clearest thing to say? Something like "please hold" or "I'll get an interpreter" or "don't hang up", that an English-speaking receptionist could pronounce without much trouble?
Thanks!
 
  • Abu Rashid

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    la7zah wa7dah (one moment)
    7ajeeb mutarjim/mutarjimah (I will get an interpreter male/female)

    Note: Male/female is the interpreter, not the person you're speaking to. ِAlso this is fairly informal way of saying it. If you want a more formal way, or a specific dialect, then you'd need to specify, although it could possibly break your requirement "that an English-speaking receptionist could pronounce without much trouble?".
     

    AbdulJabbar

    Member
    English-US
    Does "2ibqa 2ala hAtif" sound right (stay on the phone)? I learned it in school, but you can never tell...
    إبـقـى على هـاتـف
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    ابقَ على الهاتف does literally mean "stay on the phone," but to me that sounds too formal. Some colloquial variation of it may be said somewhere, but I really don't know.

    As far as the Egyptian dialect goes, I believe you can also say خليك معايا khalliik ma3aaya.
     
    Last edited:

    be.010

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Syrian)
    Hi!
    خليك عالخط إذا بتريد / من فضلك / لو سمحت... (Khalliik 3al-kha6 iza btriid/mn faDlak/law sama7t) Is commonly used in Lebanon and Syria at least, and the same order of words also works in Egypt, Iraq and Arabia... (عَ is a colloquial short form of على)...
    Another variation could be:
    ابق ع / على الخط (lit. stay online)
    Of course, خليك معايا, لحظة من فضلك... or both, are also fine.
    ابق على الهاتف (in Cham dialects, and probabley the same in Egypt) would rather mean "stay close to the phone so you can answer it quickly when it rings..." usu. said خليك عالتلفون/خليك قاعد عالتلفون...

    I am quite sure any Arab would understand most of the translations above, yet maybe it's better to wait for some other opinions, especially from Egypt and the Gulf.

    Best regards :)
     

    suma

    Senior Member
    USA
    English, USA
    If I get a call from an Arabic speaker, and I want to tell them to hold the line while I get an interpreter, what is the easiest, clearest thing to say? Something like "please hold" or "I'll get an interpreter" or "don't hang up", that an English-speaking receptionist could pronounce without much trouble?
    Thanks!
    Keeping in mind the above, maybe:
    STAna shwaya, ajEEb mutArjam
    *I put all caps to mark where the stress should be to aid pronounciation.
     

    Soos

    Senior Member
    American English, Lebanese
    la7za min faDlak t2-ajeeb mutarjim. The "t2" here comes from the word 7atta which among other things, can function as "in order to".
     
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