Please <make> this file <stored> in a safe folder.

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
I heard it said that "make" can take a past participle as an objective complement and I heard the opposite of it too.
And I myself can't assure myself whether or not "make" can take a past participle as an objective complement, as "get/have" in the following.
:I must get my hair cut.
I'll never get all this work finished.
We're having our car repaired.
ㅡ Subject + Verb + Object + Objective Complement

1. Please make this file stored in a safe folder. < This example is of my own making>
In this situation, I am asking someone to store a file in a safe folder in a hard drive.

So I'd like to know whether I can use #1 or not?

Thank you in advance for your help.
 
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  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In most situations, this form is used when somebody else does the work. This matches your first and third examples: a barber or hairdresser will cut your hair, a mechanic is repairing your car.

    Auxiliary verbs can also be used for emphasis, as in your second example. You could also say "I'll never finish all this work" with the same meaning.

    In your sentence #1, neither of these applies. You are (I think) asking a person to store the file himself or herself, and it is a simple request. Just say "Please store this file in a safe folder." If you make this request of one person but someone else (a third person) will store the file, you could say "Please have this file stored in a safe folder." "Have" is better than "make" here.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I don't think #1 would ever be used by any native speaker whether written or spoken.

    If, for some reason you can explain to us, you really want to use the second half of the sentence, you need to use something like "Please make sure that this file is stored in a safe folder". As Egmont says, "Please have (not make) this file stored in a safe folder" would be asking the person to have someone else do the task.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulianStuart, for your very helpful answer.
    I just heard someone said we could use "make" in the "situation 1."

    <Situation 1>
    I'm asking one of my subordinates to store a file in a safe folder.
    I see; I should never use "make" or "have."

    <Situation 2>
    I'm asking the manager of the data management department for him ordering his a subordinate to store a file in a safe folder.
    I see; I should never use "make"; I should use "have", instead.
    Then, how about "get"?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Whereas we can say "make him do it / have him do it / get him to do it!", we can say "Have something done", "get something done" but not "*make something done."

    Is this what you are getting at?
     
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