Pleasure ... as a response to "Thank you"

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Lotsalatte

New Member
English (US)
A person who is a native BE speaker, did me a favor. I said thank you, and this person responded with "pleasure". I know about the response "My pleasure" or "You´re welcome". Is abbreviating it to just "pleasure" commonplace and considered a "normal" thing to say, and is it mostly a BE thing? Also, why would somebody choose the "pleasure" response" over "you´re welcome"? Is there a difference in meaning or emphasis or anything?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Is abbreviating it to just "pleasure" commonplace and considered a "normal" thing to say, and is it mostly a BE thing?
    I don't recall ever hearing this reply from another American, Lotsalatte. I've certainly heard younger AE-speakers answer with the equally laconic "No problem", which seems to be the response of choice among younger AE-speakers.

    I'm not sure why many people avoid "You're welcome" these days. Perhaps that answer doesn't make any sense to them, but I still consider it normal. I assume that "Pleasure" is somebody's way of saying "It was my pleasure." Perhaps the other three words seemed like too much trouble to that BE-speaker you heard.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Is abbreviating it to just "pleasure" commonplace and considered a "normal" thing to say, and is it mostly a BE thing?
    I’ve heard it a lot from British English speakers; I don’t know if it’s exclusively or predominantly British English.
    why would somebody choose the "pleasure" response" over "you´re welcome"? Is there a difference in meaning or emphasis or anything?
    I believe every language and dialect has a number of variations on the response to “thank you.” (In American English, we have “you’re welcome,” “sure,” “sure thing,” “no problem,” “not a problem,” “my pleasure,” “anytime,” “of course,” and even “uh-huh.”). There are differences in nuance and/or register, but essentially, they are all different ways to say the same thing.
    I'm not sure why many people avoid "You're welcome" these days.
    In my experience, it’s used frequently, but so are many other variants (see above).
    Perhaps the other three words seemed like too much trouble to that BE-speaker you heard.
    Languages develop organically, and changes happen for any number of reasons over long periods of time. Diachronically, “pleasure” probably arose due to language economy reasons, but I doubt this speaker made a conscious choice to shorten the original expression. At this point, it is an established British English variant that speakers use naturally and spontaneously.
     

    Moolric

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    That's interesting Pertinax. I don't remember the last time I heard someone use "My pleasure".

    Personally I use "most welcome" or "No worries" depending on context. I did a quick search of my work Slack and I found:

    1 "it was a pleasure" (from a portuguese woman)
    1 "pleasure mate"
    1 "my pleasure" (from an Irish guy)
    5 "You're welcome" (3 from the same Aussie guy)
    213 "no worries"
    3 "no wuckas" (from the same Irish guy, pretending to be ocker)
    3 "no wucks" (unironically from an Aussie)
    1 "nah wuckin furries" from the Irish guy again, pretending to be ocker)
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    It is seldom heard in AuE. Nor do I remember hearing it as a child in BrE.
    From my perspective “You’re welcome” is becoming increasingly popular in Australian English, particularly amongst younger people but not exclusively.

    It is by no means used quite as I have heard it applied in the US, as a reflex response to almost every expression of thanks, but it certainly appears when a response to a pointed “thank you” is required.
    For example,

    I go to the register to pay my cafe bill to the hipster behind the counter. I say, “Thank you, by the way, for sorting out that issue with our order. It was partly our fault.” His response, “You’re welcome mate, no worries at all.”​
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I don't remember the last time I heard someone use "My pleasure".

    ..."no wuckas"
    I agree. “My pleasure” is becoming a very formal response, reserved for posh restaurants and fine boutiques perhaps.

    “No wuckas” however is legendary Aussie slang in a class of its own. May it never entirely fade entirely from usage! :D
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The abbreviation of "My pleasure" to "Pleasure" sounds normal to me. The response "You're welcome" I associate with AmE speakers.
    It doesn't to me: I would instinctively say that most of the time when I hear it said, it's not abbreviated like that. :confused:

    "You're welcome" is increasingly common and I get the impression it's largely replacing "My pleasure" in everyday BE use.
     

    Lotsalatte

    New Member
    English (US)
    It doesn't to me: I would instinctively say that most of the time when I hear it said, it's not abbreviated like that. :confused:

    "You're welcome" is increasingly common and I get the impression it's largely replacing "My pleasure" in everyday BE use.
    So it´s a bit oldfashioned? Would you say "My pleasure" is more commonly used in some parts of the UK rather than others? What about the "pleasure" only, would that be a regional thing as well?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    So it´s a bit oldfashioned? Would you say "My pleasure" is more commonly used in some parts of the UK rather than others? What about the "pleasure" only, would that be a regional thing as well?
    It's beginning to come across as sounding a little bit formal, so I suppose if you interpret formality in everyday conversation as being a bit old-fashioned these days - yes, it's not something the younger generation tend to use much.

    I'm afraid I've no idea whether any of it is regional in the UK.
     

    Pertinax

    Senior Member
    BrE->AuE
    I'm not sure whether the expression is formal-sounding or if it's just one that younger people don't use much now. I do use it myself - perhaps because my father also used it. I would not usually say it unless it was, to some extent at least, true. More often than than "My pleasure" I might say "It was a pleasure" or "It would be a pleasure". The contraction to "[A] pleasure" (sometimes with a barely articulated "a") might be in response to thanks for something fairly minor, akin to "Don't mention it".
     
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